XenForo 1.0 System Requirements Test

mlx

Well-known member
It's my own debian server.
Sorry, on this engine I do nothing chances. There run other important applications and make money.
Maybe I take temporary a simple webspace for testing xF.

If it's that important you should most definitely upgrade!

Active support for PHP 5.2 has ended with the recent release of PHP 5.2.14. All users of PHP 5.2 are encouraged to upgrade to PHP 5.3!
 
F

Floris

Guest
Well, can you blame them, Mikey? I mean, Cpanel is the most widely used [backend] server system out there.
If only you knew the statistics from hosting providers, you wouldn't say that. The amount of dedicated solutions without a control panel out there almost outweighs the one with a control panel. A good majority runs their own control panel software, and while cpanel might be popular, it's not a default.
 

Eric

Active member
If it's that important you should most definitely upgrade!

Active support for PHP 5.2 has ended with the recent release of PHP 5.2.14. All users of PHP 5.2 are encouraged to upgrade to PHP 5.3!
It seems a lot of folks don't like upgrading beyond what their current OS supports. As far as Debian for DSF, if it's Lenny, the highest version they support w/the package manager is 5.2.6 (5.2.6.dfsg.1-1+lenny9).
 

Erik

Well-known member
Well, can you blame them, Mikey? I mean, Cpanel is the most widely used [backend] server system out there.
I don't know about you, but personally I don't find paying $15/month for a cPanel/WHM license on my VPS worth it. So far I've been able to do everything from the command line, and if I ever want more convenience I can install one of the free/open-source control panels. :)
 

mlx

Well-known member
I don't know about you, but personally I don't find paying $15/month for a cPanel/WHM license on my VPS worth it. So far I've been able to do everything from the command line, and if I ever want more convenience I can install one of the free/open-source control panels. :)

Yeah it's overhead if you are the only user and know what you are doing. None of our busy forum servers are running it.

That said it's the best control panel I've been "playing" with yet. And can be handy if you start hosting other people's websites :)
 

Dean

in memoriam
Is there a certain size PHP memory that should be used?

My understanding is that the default for php memory_limit is 128MB for php 5.2+, but some hosting providers give 64MB or even 32MB as the default value.
 

Mike

XenForo developer
Staff member
Some areas could use more memory, but we generally try to make it work with 8MB. I do know of one situation that didn't handle that (in an import), and I'm still planning on looking into it to see why.
 

NewEraCracker

New member
My memory_limit is 64 MB. I am using a custom implementation of nginx 0.8.50 + php 5.2.14 (fcgi) + mysql 5.1.50 (with innodb disabled) on my windows server.

And I get this:
The required PHP extension MySQLi could not be found. Please ask your host to install this extension.

I tried to implement MySQLi in the past but my way of killing MySQLd seems to corrupt innodb databases.
 

Dean

in memoriam
Some areas could use more memory, but we generally try to make it work with 8MB. I do know of one situation that didn't handle that (in an import), and I'm still planning on looking into it to see why.
Whoa.... that is tremendous!

I would not worry about making it even better. Starting with IPB 3.1.1 IPS recommends 128MB, and either gives a warning or does not work with 64MB (don't recall). Thought you may find that information of use.
 

Mike

XenForo developer
Staff member
Oh, to be fair, I would *recommend* 128M. That is the default in recent PHP versions. Historically, it has been 8MB, so that's usually something to target. Memory usage differs tremendously. One big difference is between 64-bit and 32-bit, because of the size of pointers within PHP, but that's probably more than you wanted to know. :) Opcode caches change memory usage as well.
 

Dean

in memoriam
Oh, to be fair, I would *recommend* 128M. That is the default in recent PHP versions. Historically, it has been 8MB, so that's usually something to target. Memory usage differs tremendously. One big difference is between 64-bit and 32-bit, because of the size of pointers within PHP, but that's probably more than you wanted to know. :) Opcode caches change memory usage as well.
I actually know a bit more than I let on...

I case it is of interest earlier this year I looked at our hosting accounts. Hostgator shared hosting uses 32 bit, and has memory_limit = 64MB. Servint uses vps accounts use 32 bit Virtuozzo, and has memory_limit = 32MB standard, but we changed that because we had root access.

I believe Godaddy is set up like Hostgator as well.
 

Forsaken

Well-known member
I actually know a bit more than I let on...
 
I case it is of interest earlier this year I looked at our hosting accounts. Hostgator shared hosting uses 32 bit, and has memory_limit = 64MB. Servint uses vps accounts use 32 bit Virtuozzo, and has memory_limit = 32MB standard, but we changed that because we had root access.
 
I believe Godaddy is set up like Hostgator as well.
Most shared hosting will have 32MB.
 
Top