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Bye bye php 5.3

xf_phantom

Well-known member
#1
http://news.php.net/php.internals/67734

Hi,

As the release of PHP 5.5.0 is imminent it is time to implement the
decision about PHP 5.3's EOL.

In https://wiki.php.net/rfc/php53eol it was decided that PHP 5.3 should
go into "security only" mode once PHP 5.5 was released. As PHP 5.3.27
has been branched of and is aimed for release in two weeks time
(5.3.27RC1 tomorrow) this will be after 5.5.0 and therefore the last
"regular" PHP 5.3 release.
Currently there is no plan to release 5.3.28 so the
PHP-5.3 BRANCH IS CLOSED NOW.
In case you have missed today's branching point and have regular fixes
please alert me quoting the specific items incl. ETA so 5.3.28 or an
additional 5.3.27RC can be considered.

For security issues please contact me as well as security at php.net for
triaging.

Good bye 5.3, you were a great step for PHP!
Looking forward to a bright and open future!

johannes
 

xf_phantom

Well-known member
#3
Me too, and i'm looking for xenforo requiring at least php 5.3:D (php 5.4 now) so the devs can start using the killerfeatures

Wouldn't 1.2 gold be perfect to change the requirements?:D
 

Moshe1010

Well-known member
#4
I've tried PHP 5.5 RC3 and XF. First, the memory that XF used decreased by 50%. Second, it was blazing fast. On average I had 0.08 sec per a page, even those with 40 comments per page. With ZO+ integrated in php 5.5, this is going to be a great success.
 

Mike

XenForo developer
Staff member
#5
Me too, and i'm looking for xenforo requiring at least php 5.3:D (php 5.4 now) so the devs can start using the killerfeatures

Wouldn't 1.2 gold be perfect to change the requirements?:D
I now look forward to XenForo 2.0 being able to require PHP 5.3 once it's EOL'd... :rolleyes:

I'm pretty sure that PHP 5.2 is still super prevalent due to RHEL installs which makes it tough to be too cutting edge.
 

Adam Howard

Well-known member
#6
I now look forward to XenForo 2.0 being able to require PHP 5.3 once it's EOL'd... :rolleyes:

I'm pretty sure that PHP 5.2 is still super prevalent due to RHEL installs which makes it tough to be too cutting edge.
Anyone using 5.2 is just asking to be hacked. Google turns up page after page of known security problems with it. It's like easy pickings.

I'll be very excited to move from php 5.4 to 5.5. And unlike the move from 5.3 to 5.4, the is better backward compatibility for 5.4 / 5.5
 

Sim

Well-known member
#7
Ubuntu's LTS servers are also very far behind with PHP releases.

10.04 LTS, which will be supported until April 2015 is only running 5.3.2
12.04 LTS which will be supported until April 2017 is running 5.3.10

12.04 is the current LTS release, and so is still actively encouraged for production use - which means that 5.3 is going to be around for a long time yet.

I do note that 13.04 (not LTS) uses 5.4.9

It will be interesting to see what version 14.04 LTS uses.
 

Adam Howard

Well-known member
#8
Ubuntu's LTS servers are also very far behind with PHP releases.

10.04 LTS, which will be supported until April 2015 is only running 5.3.2
12.04 LTS which will be supported until April 2017 is running 5.3.10

12.04 is the current LTS release, and so is still actively encouraged for production use - which means that 5.3 is going to be around for a long time yet.

I do note that 13.04 (not LTS) uses 5.4.9

It will be interesting to see what version 14.04 LTS uses.
^ I'd say that's still more current than Red Hat.

But for Ubuntu and Debian I would suggest...

Dotdeb.org

So current you can even try php 5.5 RC 3 if you want. ;)
 

Code Monkey

Well-known member
#9
Ubuntu's LTS servers are also very far behind with PHP releases.

10.04 LTS, which will be supported until April 2015 is only running 5.3.2
12.04 LTS which will be supported until April 2017 is running 5.3.10

12.04 is the current LTS release, and so is still actively encouraged for production use - which means that 5.3 is going to be around for a long time yet.

I do note that 13.04 (not LTS) uses 5.4.9

It will be interesting to see what version 14.04 LTS uses.
I'm running 5.4 on 12.04 precise. It's not a big deal to upgrade it.
 

RickM

Well-known member
#16
Whats the difference between 5.3 and 5.4/5.5?
5.4 added some pretty significant new features that are part of the efforts to bring PHP in line with modern programming languages, and generally make it a hell of a lot nicer to use. Some of the new features were:

Class member access on instantiation, meaning you can do this:
PHP:
$Username = (new User)->getUser($id)->getUsername();
Support for binary values.
Class::{expr}() syntax support.
Traits (this is one of the big features you'll see used everywhere)
Array dereferencing support


Then there is the stuff they fixed, such as removing safe_mode and regster_globals (finally!)

PHP 5.5 adds things like generators, list support within foreach statements, and the biggest feature - Easy Password API - this is going to be HUGE. With this it will mean we no longer have to put up with idiots "securing" their password with md5 or sha1, it provides a secure bcrypt hashing system, creating considerably more secure passwords.

Google around to see what other features have been added to the two.
 
#17
5.4 added some pretty significant new features that are part of the efforts to bring PHP in line with modern programming languages, and generally make it a hell of a lot nicer to use. Some of the new features were:

Class member access on instantiation, meaning you can do this:
PHP:
$Username = (new User)->getUser($id)->getUsername();
Support for binary values.
Class::{expr}() syntax support.
Traits (this is one of the big features you'll see used everywhere)
Array dereferencing support


Then there is the stuff they fixed, such as removing safe_mode and regster_globals (finally!)

PHP 5.5 adds things like generators, list support within foreach statements, and the biggest feature - Easy Password API - this is going to be HUGE. With this it will mean we no longer have to put up with idiots "securing" their password with md5 or sha1, it provides a secure bcrypt hashing system, creating considerably more secure passwords.

Google around to see what other features have been added to the two.
Seems pretty cool. I don't really pay attention to all this stuff.
 

Adam Howard

Well-known member
#20
PHP Version usage stats: http://w3techs.com/technologies/details/pl-php/5/all

It's damn stupid. The likes of cPanel are a big part of the blame for this.

We're in the middle of a large build that will be for a distributed php system and had to make sure we supported php 5.3 despite it being EOL'd. We wont be able to use 5.5 features for a good 3 years.
cPanel is awful when it comes to keeping things current. This is one of the reason why I recommend Direct Admin.

  • It's current (choices are php 5.3, 5.4, 5.5)
  • Can be customized to use outside sources (packages)
  • Offers all the basic features of cPanel
  • Supports a wide rang of OS (operating systems)
  • Better on resources (uses less than cPanel)
  • Is more economical (cost less)

The next alternative would be Web Admin / Virtual admin. Although its not as easy for some people to use.

Most people would be better of learning how to use ssh in my opinion. But obviously, when you factor in shared hosting and those less "tech aware", control panels still hold up.
 
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