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Where is your computer?

Where is your computer?

  • Lounge

    Votes: 8 21.1%
  • Room

    Votes: 19 50.0%
  • Office

    Votes: 10 26.3%
  • Kitchen

    Votes: 1 2.6%
  • Other, comment please !

    Votes: 6 15.8%

  • Total voters
    38

Allan

Well-known member
#1
Where is your computer ?

I wonder where the people put their computers, (not netbook and portable computer)
 

JVCode

Well-known member
#2
Well my main tower is in my home office, and laptop stays in the living room. I wouldn't be able to put my main tower in the living room even if I wanted to, the wife would go mad! I'm a hater for mess and clutter aswell, so I wouldn't do that anyway.
 

Brogan

XenForo moderator
Staff member
#4
Used to be the office but now it's the lounge, connected to the router, plasma and amp via ethernet, HDMI and coaxial.
 

Fred Sherman

Well-known member
#8
I'm in the "other" category. My servers are in the garage, which I converted into a small datacenter.

The garage has two separate 60 amp circuits. One is wired into each of the top plugs, the other into the bottom, so that each wall socket has two circuits. One circuit is supported by a gas-powered emergency generator and each circuit has a UPS with enough battery reserve for 10 minutes of operation - enough time to cut over to the generator.

Two T1's come into the house, each to its own switch. All servers have redundant NICs and power supplies.

All servers are either RHEL using RHEL Cluster Suite or Windows Cluster Server.
 

Peggy

Well-known member
#9
I'm in the "other" category. My servers are in the garage, which I converted into a small datacenter.

The garage has two separate 60 amp circuits. One is wired into each of the top plugs, the other into the bottom, so that each wall socket has two circuits. One circuit is supported by a gas-powered emergency generator and each circuit has a UPS with enough battery reserve for 10 minutes of operation - enough time to cut over to the generator.

Two T1's come into the house, each to its own switch. All servers have redundant NICs and power supplies.

All servers are either RHEL using RHEL Cluster Suite or Windows Cluster Server.
WOW, that's quite a setup.
 

Edrondol

Well-known member
#10
I have my computer in the family room. I used to have it down in the finished basement, but I was the only one who ever went down there. So when new games came out or I was tinkering I'd find myself increasingly isolated from the wife & kids. So I brought the whole thing up, made room where there was none and now I can play AND be a part of the family. And my wife loves it because Farmville doesn't work worth a damn on her laptop.
 

CTXMedia

Formerly CyclingTribe
#11
Laptop next to the leather recliner in the main family room. Home PC in the bedroom (wife didn't like the noise/size/clutter in the living room).

Office PC a few miles from home, and server in datacentre in South East of the country.

Oh, and iPhone that I can use to remotely access all three goes with me everywhere.

Sad, but true ... :)

Cheers,
Shaun :D
 

Fred Sherman

Well-known member
#13
WOW, that's quite a setup.
More of an occupational hazard. At any given moment, one of my clients could have a problem which required me to bring up a set of virtual machines to duplicate their environment and develop a fix - either code or procedures. Some of them measure the cost of downtime per hour in the $millions.
 

Drky

New member
#14
I used to have elaborate setups but have an MBP from 3 or 4 years back (a 2.2 Core 2 Duo) which acts as my main computer. The battery isn't connected, and I have it hooked up to a fairly big monitor.

I use my work laptop (a nice and light Dell Latitude) as my mobile machine.

More of an occupational hazard. At any given moment, one of my clients could have a problem which required me to bring up a set of virtual machines to duplicate their environment and develop a fix - either code or procedures. Some of them measure the cost of downtime per hour in the $millions.
Then why are you running it out of your garage?
 

JVCode

Well-known member
#15
More of an occupational hazard. At any given moment, one of my clients could have a problem which required me to bring up a set of virtual machines to duplicate their environment and develop a fix - either code or procedures. Some of them measure the cost of downtime per hour in the $millions.
Millions of dollars? you have that many clients from your garage and only having two T1 lines? I don't think so :)
 

Fred Sherman

Well-known member
#18
Millions of dollars? you have that many clients from your garage and only having two T1 lines? I don't think so :)
I think you misunderstood. I don't host anyone other than my own projects there. My clients have their own data centers with their own servers which I've installed and configured for them. Mostly IBM Power Systems, but also a fair amout of Dell M910 blades lately.

This is my lab that I use to provide them support when they have problems. Everything is virtualized either using VMware or IBM Logical partitions. I might only have a dozen servers, but I can bring up to 100 VMs and LPARs online to mimic their environments

Sometimes I have to write code and sometimes I just have to duplicate the problem and develop the procedures for recovering the apps and data. But what I always have to do is be responsive, even at 3am or during a thunderstorm when the power's been knocked out on the whole block (its happened).

Sorry if I was unclear on that.

Then why are you running it out of your garage?
Why not? Its not like its really a garage, its just what the space was originally designed for. It suits my needs. I've built and ran data centers for almost 20 year. Now I can work from home. I get to be my own boss and pay myself what I'm worth instead of what someone else thinks I'm worth.

I've seen people convert their garage into a game room so they can have a pool table. I converted mine into a small data center so I can have a life.
 

Drky

New member
#20
Why not? Its not like its really a garage, its just what the space was originally designed for. It suits my needs. I've built and ran data centers for almost 20 year. Now I can work from home. I get to be my own boss and pay myself what I'm worth instead of what someone else thinks I'm worth.

I've seen people convert their garage into a game room so they can have a pool table. I converted mine into a small data center so I can have a life.
You're right, I'd love to see photos of the setup.