Future privacy rules and quotes

Adam Howard

Well-known member
That's irrelevant though isn't it? The legislation seems to exclude anything vital to operations so I don't see how they're going to make you purge IP logs.
You maybe right. It very well maybe irrelevant in regards to IP addresses.

It was after all only a quick, preliminary first glance comment and my "interpretation" of what I was told, could be incorrectly interpreted.
 

Adam Howard

Well-known member
That would be the case if everyone has a fixed IP. I'm not sure if americans are the one's that have more fixed IPs than europeans. A dude of mine got recently banned from an IRC channel and people were wondering why he kept coming back until his provider was banned from the IRC.
Static IP's in the Americas? lol :ROFLMAO:

I had to get a VPN provider not just to mask myself for peace of mind, but because my IP would change so regularly, sometimes hourly, that people thought I was "up to something" or was a bot or a shared account. :sneaky:

No the americas don't have a strong static ip policy that I'm aware of.
 

SneakyDave

Well-known member
Static IP's in the Americas? lol :ROFLMAO:

I had to get a VPN provider not just to mask myself for peace of mind, but because my IP would change so regularly, sometimes hourly, that people thought I was "up to something" or was a bot or a shared account. :sneaky:

No the americas don't have a strong static ip policy that I'm aware of.
I've had a static IP for 10 years. It's pretty easy if you can spare $5 a month.

:rolleyes:
 

Tracy Perry

Well-known member
Once IPv6 becomes more prevalent, perhaps. But DHCP is the rule for the majority of Internet providers.
Yep, every one that offers service in my area is DHCP by default - but for a nominal fee of between $9.99 - $14.99 a month, you to can have a fixed ip. :p
 

erich37

Well-known member
In Germany there is no such law either.
The "right to forget" (doit a l'oubli in french) laws are not ready yet BUT they will be in a matter of weeks.


It defines whether created content has enough "depht" to be copyrighted.
Also, this is more a privacy law issue than intellectual property, but I have a good grasp of what's coming.
It's all about Privacy Protection.


The issue largely originated due to Farcebook not "hard-deleting" your data, although you have deleted your data at the frontend and Facebook telling you that your data has been deleted.
In fact, FB only "soft-deletes" your data. So FB has been sued by several users in Germany and Austria about this issue.

http://www.zdnet.com/no-more-fake-n...h-facebook-over-pseudonym-lawsuit-7000014539/

http://www.macworld.com/article/116...lawsuit_over_friend_finder_personal_data.html


There is still lots of "political" back and forth banter about Privacy-laws in Europe, so I guess it is not yet fully baked which way it is going. Either more "Privacy Protection" or less. It is still in the air.

http://epic.org/privacy/intl/eu_data_protection_directive.html

Generally speaking, the "Political European Union" is a piece of crap (n)


:coffee:
 

Alpha1

Well-known member
So how does the right to be forgotten apply to TV, video and copyright? If I get a speeding ticket from cops with a TV show, then can I demand they remove the video? lol
Can criminals demand that any news article about them will be removed?
 
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