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Starting late with coding

kyrgyz

Well-known member
#1
Any advice on the quickest and most efficient way of getting coding skills without going to college? Are good books enough? I just don't know where to start.
 

Eric

Active member
#4
I wouldn't say there really is a "quick" way of getting skills. I suppose it depends on what languages, etc, you're wanting to work with; but generally I find books have worked rather well. Personally, I learned PHP/MySQL by being self-taught. I started by reading the PHP manual, then tutorials, then breaking down / building my own versions of pre-made scripts, etc.
 

DoctorWatsOn

Well-known member
#5
Actually I am not sure why I ‘liked’ the OP, as I never wanted to get involved in coding, I just want to ‘plug & play’.

However, having upgraded to vB4 I’ve found it’s been more of a case of ‘plug & pray’, so I’ve ended-up doing small bits of coding and I *think* I may want to get into it a little more, but on the other hand…..
 

kyrgyz

Well-known member
#7
generally I find books have worked rather well. Personally, I learned PHP/MySQL by being self-taught. I started by reading the PHP manual, then tutorials, then breaking down / building my own versions of pre-made scripts, etc.
I guess that's the way to go. Thanks.
 

kyrgyz

Well-known member
#10
I *think* I may want to get into it a little more, but on the other hand…..
As I age I realize I need to keep my mind sharp and going. I love math, astronomy and playing chess. Coding will be a challenge, but I think it's worth in the long run for its mental load and creativity. Time for me to order good books. Any suggestions if you don't mind, guys?

Edit: Thank you, Eric. I'll check that book out.
 

Dean

Well-known member
#12
Sitting down with someone that knows what they are doing for an hour would be my first choice.

Now if only I had access to one of those people...
 

Disjunto

Well-known member
#15
I've never read a book to learn any language...

Think of a small project that could be interesting; now think of a smaller one and try and make it, read official docs for the systems you're using and ask people for advice if you really can't think. It's not hard to learn to code if you're in the right mindset
 

Kuma

Active member
#16
Start with something simple, for example go try to program a php script to count to 50 and output it on a page.

As much as trial and error will get you in the right direction, if you don't have a goal you're not really going anywhere.
 

kyrgyz

Well-known member
#17
Think of a small project that could be interesting; now think of a smaller one and try and make it, read official docs for the systems you're using and ask people for advice if you really can't think.
Wow. A good way of taking it on. You just made coding look like a weekend project for instructables.com.:D
 

Disjunto

Well-known member
#19
obviously looking at other people code/reading books will help with good coding practices and closing security holes, but other than that, teaching yourself by giving yourself a small project has always been a fun and useful way to learn a language for me :)
 

kyrgyz

Well-known member
#20
Chess, now there’s a game I haven’t played for a few years.

It all went wrong when a few of us got together for a weekly chess match, paying in £5 each – winner took all.

After 6 weeks the others got fed-up giving me their money – lol. :D
One can't expect less from Doctor Watson, unless Sherlock Holmes shows up at your weekly chess tournament and applies his golden method of deduction. Then you are in trouble. Haha:)