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learning C++

Jo.

Well-known member
#1
I need to learn C++ as part of my PhD but I'm currently too ill to go to classes (been signed off since October by my doctor - grrr!). Anyway, I'm fed up of not being able to get on with things and I was wondering if anyone could recommend a good book on learning C++? I've got some experience coding with Java and Matlab, but I need a book that's easy to follow and easy to read (lots of white space and/or colour use) because I'm dyslexic and it can be really difficult for me using books to learn from.
 

SilverCircle

Well-known member
#2
Well,

Thinking in C++ by Bruce Eckels is a quite nice work for beginners which can be (legally) downloaded from the net. Just google it.

Another very good book for beginners would be this one. That's the first C++ book I ever read and it explains the basics in a very easy to understand way.

Also, check out the stuff from Scott Meyers, a true C++ guru. The books he mentions on this page are not for real beginners though, but Design Patterns is one of the best books to read after you've mastered the basics of C++.

The C++ FAQ is also a very good source when you already know the language. There is an even more comprehensive printed version, but being a FAQ, it is not exactly for beginners either.

Stay away from crap like "c++ for dummies" or "learning C++ in 21 days".
 

EQnoble

Well-known member
#3
Well,

Thinking in C++ by Bruce Eckels is a quite nice work for beginners which can be (legally) downloaded from the net. Just google it.

Another very good book for beginners would be this one. That's the first C++ book I ever read and it explains the basics in a very easy to understand way.

Also, check out the stuff from Scott Meyers, a true C++ guru. The books he mentions on this page are not for real beginners though, but Design Patterns is one of the best books to read after you've mastered the basics of C++.

The C++ FAQ is also a very good source when you already know the language. There is an even more comprehensive printed version, but being a FAQ, it is not exactly for beginners either.

Stay away from crap like "c++ for dummies" or "learning C++ in 21 days".
Thanks both of you for starting this thread and for replying with some good resources, I have an interest in learning c++ and have (had) no clue where to start. This is a big help.

...and PhD, whoa! what's up Doc. Good luck with that and I hope you feel better sooner than later.
 

Jason

Well-known member
#4
I agree with SilverCircle, you'll want the Scott Meyers books. In particular Effective C++ and Effective STL. There's quite a lot of C++ syntax and STL idioms that are not that obvious, which makes these books useful (particularly the first one) even if you're just starting out.

Stroustrup 's books will teach you a lot -- they're probably the only C++ books I have around my desk at all times.

Accelerated C++ by Koenig and Moo is always a good choice, as well.
 

Jo.

Well-known member
#5
Thanks guys! I really appreciate it! Will check out these suggestions and hopefully I can get started. :)
 

Andy.N

Well-known member
#12
Nerd alert!

Thanks for the list Andy, have that written away to disk for later reference.
I also saved page source there :) That is a helluva reading list my friend.
Gentlemen,
My audience is quantitative finance professionals who work on Wall Street and if you like long reading list, may I interest you in some other very popular list we have
http://www.quantnet.com/quantnet-best-selling-books-2010/
http://www.quantnet.com/goldman-sachs-reading-list/
 

Jason

Well-known member
#15
http://www.cplusplus.com/info/
Anyone fluent in C++ think this may be a good place for someone with little to no experience in C++ to take a look at before committing to learning such a thing?
It's ok, if you just need a quick reference. I wouldn't recommend it for those learning the language, since it contains some poor examples, and occasionally awful documentation on some functions. I'd check out the C++ FAQ (Lite) instead, though its not really aimed at beginners.

Your best bet, for something free and online would be Thinking in C++, as SilverCircle mentioned earlier. You might also want to check out Stroustrup's site, http://www2.research.att.com/~bs/. Guru of the Week is a pretty good read as well, even if a bit dated.
 

EQnoble

Well-known member
#16
It's ok, if you just need a quick reference. I wouldn't recommend it for those learning the language, since it contains some poor examples, and occasionally awful documentation on some functions. I'd check out the C++ FAQ (Lite) instead, though its not really aimed at beginners.

Your best bet, for something free and online would be Thinking in C++, as SilverCircle mentioned earlier. You might also want to check out Stroustrup's site, http://www2.research.att.com/~bs/. Guru of the Week is a pretty good read as well, even if a bit dated.
Awesome Jason, thanks for taking the time out for this. :)