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jQuery 2.0 Kills IE 6,7,8 Support

captainslater

Well-known member
#3
While I'm OK with this very old versions of Internet Explorer - there are many companies using IE 8 without a chance to upgrade quickly to IE 9.
 

Anthony Parsons

Well-known member
#4
About time major contributors to web language started to put some pressure on corporations who keep using the same old nonsense excuse that they can't upgrade their browser... what garbage. They can install any number of alternatives, typically Firefox being the one, all from their little console to be deployed over thousands of systems, as required. They can't keep using this "security" BS excuse, as older browsers are far less secure.
 

Shelley

Well-known member
#6
I'm OK with this.

The file size of jQuery kept getting bigger and bigger, because they had code needed for each version to natively support things.

File size is now smaller and loads more smoothly ... ie .... Optimized better.

IE 6, 7, and 8 are all over 5 years old, that is 1/2 a decade. Either upgrade already or switch browsers (better to switch browsers).
Agreed.

Anyhow, I can't take a browser seriously that doesn't support text-shadow. (including ie9) << which was a crime in itself.
 

captainslater

Well-known member
#7
Well, I'm working for a health care company with about 30.000 employees. There are several programs which are optimized for IE because they were written when no other browser was shipped with Windows. I do not support this sort of IT but that's the way it is sometimes.
Just upgrading IE and programms are not working in a hospital could be a bad deal, hm?
 

Anthony Parsons

Well-known member
#8
If sysadmins weren't working on fixing that the moment IE9 got deployed, again... its back to excuses. Sorry... but excuses are rife in IT for why someone hasn't been on top of things. The same with IE10, if they aren't already on it, then there are serious issues in the IT department.
 

Chris D

XenForo developer
Staff member
#9
jQuery 2.0 Kills IE 6,7,8 Support
Good.

Nonsense they can't. That is an excuse. A network admin can package an upgrade and deploy it within minutes.
As a network admin who does this, I wholeheartedly agree.

And "compatibility" is just an excuse too.

We make things work. Compatibility View works.

We roll out new browsers ASAP and always have very few issues afterwards.
 

Forsaken

Well-known member
#10
If sysadmins weren't working on fixing that the moment IE9 got deployed, again... its back to excuses. Sorry... but excuses are rife in IT for why someone hasn't been on top of things. The same with IE10, if they aren't already on it, then there are serious issues in the IT department.
Corporations are governed by the accounting department, so IT departments very rarely have any say in what gets upgrading, especially when it would break compatibility with required software done by a outsourced party (Which is generally the case).

IT departments are who you call when there are issues, they almost never have any say in the management or the upgrade process other than putting it into effect.


Good.

As a network admin who does this, I wholeheartedly agree.

And "compatibility" is just an excuse too.

We make things work. Compatibility View works.

We roll out new browsers ASAP and always have very few issues afterwards.
Unless your department does the programs in-house, compatibility is a major issue. Most companies outsource, which is why so many corporations are dependent on legacy applications and browsers.
 
#11
If sysadmins weren't working on fixing that the moment IE9 got deployed, again... its back to excuses. Sorry... but excuses are rife in IT for why someone hasn't been on top of things. The same with IE10, if they aren't already on it, then there are serious issues in the IT department.
sorry Anthony but that is far from reality in usual companies ;) You just can't upgrade a system on your own, usually you use proprietary software that comes with service contracts and every adjustment is pretty expensive. Good luck if you try to upgrade parts of the system ;)

Imho theres no real issue here, you can still deliver legacy 1.9 for <IE9 by using conditionals.
 

RobParker

Well-known member
#12
Nonsense they can't. That is an excuse. A network admin can package an upgrade and deploy it within minutes.
Like it or not, there are many companies still running IE6/7 to maintain compatibility with very specialised internal systems. It's not just a case of upgrading the browser, it's a case of all the vital legacy code that would need upgrading/rewriting/etc.
 

Lucas

Well-known member
#13
Like it or not, there are many companies still running IE6/7 to maintain compatibility with very specialised internal systems. It's not just a case of upgrading the browser, it's a case of all the vital legacy code that would need upgrading/rewriting/etc.
Then it's time to stop filling up their own pockets and 'waste' their money on their business so it can prosper and stop bottle-necking the industry. :)
 

RobParker

Well-known member
#15
Then it's time to stop filling up their own pockets and 'waste' their money on their business so it can prosper and stop bottle-necking the industry. :)
Which industry? I think you'll find they're all perfectly happy in whatever sector they're in. Their own systems work perfectly fine with IE6 and if it means employees can't waste hours on Facebook all the better.
 

Adam Howard

Well-known member
#17
Well, I'm working for a health care company with about 30.000 employees. There are several programs which are optimized for IE because they were written when no other browser was shipped with Windows. I do not support this sort of IT but that's the way it is sometimes.
Just upgrading IE and programms are not working in a hospital could be a bad deal, hm?
If the world around X company, business, or field changes .... In this case medical ..... That X company, business, or field must change with it.

This old general idea that the world must be wrapped around X is incorrect. X must follow the world.

And the tech world is moving forward.
 

Anthony Parsons

Well-known member
#18
Like, like, like, like, like...

I am getting so sick and tired of hearing the nonsense argument by companies that its all too hard because of some other proprietary integration. IE6 is over a decade old. If you haven't upgraded your IT in a decade, you really do have serious issues in your IT department, people should be sacked, and the company get people with drive into the positions of power to ensure compliancy and forward momentum.

Like above... company x can't continue using nonsense excuses to hold back the web. With jquery support dying, good I say. The more major contributors forcing nonsense, outdated excuses to upgrade or get offline, the better IMHO.
 
#19
you simply don't get it. It's not to hard in the first place, it's expensive. If you have no idea how proprietary software (and especially licenses/service contracts) are handled then don't try to imagine it on 0 knowledge. Pretty often you are not even allowed to *upgrade* (don't mix that with update) if you won't loose support unless you buy a full new package.
Not upgrading IE6(8) to anything else doesn't mean it's insecure in general. In fact IE6(8) can be more secure than a new version if admins know their job. And if it still does what it's used for there's no need to jump on the upgrade-train.
 

Adam Howard

Well-known member
#20
you simply don't get it. It's not to hard in the first place, it's expensive. If you have no idea how proprietary software (and especially licenses/service contracts) are handled then don't try to imagine it on 0 knowledge. Pretty often you are not even allowed to *upgrade* (don't mix that with update) if you won't loose support unless you buy a full new package.
Not upgrading IE6(8) to anything else doesn't mean it's insecure in general. In fact IE6(8) can be more secure than a new version if admins know their job. And if it still does what it's used for there's no need to jump on the upgrade-train.
If X company can not afford to upgrade after 10 years... I would think about finding a new job as X company will not be around much longer.

1) Clearly it is not making money to spend
2) The tech world does not wait for anyone and on that path, X company's current business model will no longer work

On another subject....

IE6 can never be secure. There is a root flaw in the product its self. So unless you make your own custom ie6, which would be more timely and costly, than updating and would most likely make you incompatible with everyone else......