Goodbye forums, Hello Facebook groups!

Anthony Parsons

Well-known member
100% sure user generated content is personal data.
Incorrect.

What constitutes personal data?
The GDPR applies to ‘personal data’ meaning any information relating to an identifiable person who can be directly or indirectly identified in particular by reference to an identifier. This definition provides for a wide range of personal identifiers to constitute personal data, including name, identification number, location data or online identifier, reflecting changes in technology and the way organisations collect information about people.
If you don't understand GDPR, go read it from the EU GDPR site: https://www.eugdpr.org/gdpr-faqs.html
 

S Thomas

Well-known member
I don't know what you didn't understand, but that actually just proves my point. Posts are bound to an IP (& email), and IPs (& email) are considered as private data, i.e. data which can be used to "directly or indirectly" identify you ("personal identifiers", "online identifiers"), thus, posts are personal data, because per definition this is data which relates to an "identifiable person who can be directly or indirectly identified in particular by reference to an identifier".
The thing here now comes in another wording - companies can decide if they want to provide a minimalistic data export (containing user provided data only such as email) or a full data export containing everything, including user-generated content.

Anyways, just looking at any major company handling data access and data portability would have shown you how it's meant, but he, I guess, Google, Facebook, Tinder and all those tech-companies with heavy user-generated content haven't understood GDPR aswell, right? They are probably just providing your generated content to you because it's fun I assume. Tons of traffic and data storage, sharing their precious collected stuff with you. Ever thought about why they do that? Not like they have anything to gain from it.

Actually, the fun part is, that these data exports existed even pre GDPR on many services. Some weren't free, some not in digital form, but whatever. You could have migrated your data including user-generated content prior to GDPR, but with GDPR you have a right to demand for it - in a structured, machine readable way. However, it's the companies decision if they want to fulfill your demand.
I don't know how it was regulated before GDPR, or if it was regulated at all, but for a fact, GDPR does include that.
 

Anthony Parsons

Well-known member
I don't know what you didn't understand, but that actually just proves my point. Posts are bound to an IP (& email), and IPs (& email) are considered as private data, i.e. data which can be used to "directly or indirectly" identify you ("personal identifiers", "online identifiers"), thus, posts are personal data, because per definition this is data which relates to an "identifiable person who can be directly or indirectly identified in particular by reference to an identifier".
No, they're not bound. We are at XF, yes? So, with XF, when you delete a user and GDPR compliant the username to some random name, the IP associated to posted content no longer links to any personal identifiable information, and email is gone, as the account is gone, and IP does not link to any email.

Read the GDPR... you're reaching a long way. You can also control your IP logging, if you want to go above and beyond, and set it super low if you had an account turnover, ie. are in the EU serving EU with your XF forum.

Now, if you're not talking about XF and GDPR -- don't know.
 

S Thomas

Well-known member
So, with XF, when you delete [...] You can also control your IP logging [...]
Nobody ever talked about deleting nor changing the config. The status quo for every single post on a standard XF (and G+, Facebook, whatever) instance is that your post is associated with your private data. Obviously, deleting or changing the status quo will result in a different scenario.
Always fun to argue with someone who just simply changes the situation to fit his argument.
 

kuyenmotdivad

Well-known member
I can't see forums dying, as some people don't use Facebook due to past Facebook problems that people have had (including me). I only use it now due to having family and friends all over the world and it's an easy way to contact them.
 

Tracy Perry

Well-known member
That was pre GDPR, right? Pretty sure data portability is one of the major aspects of GDPR.
For a specific person... and I don't think there is any specific format that data has to be provided in.
GDPR has the right to be forgotten (that's where the data personal data is anonymized in XF but the content remains). The content is not classified as personal data as it can easily be anonymized so that it's not related to that user.
The EU's definition of personal data is pretty clear cut.
The personal data that is portable does not consist of your posts/content (although if the admin desires they can allow that also).
 
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S Thomas

Well-known member
GDPR has the right to be forgotten (that's where the data personal data is anonymized in XF but the content remains). The content is not classified as personal data as it can easily be anonymized so that it's not related to that user.
The EU's definition of personal data is pretty clear cut.
That only works for public forums, because, well, it would be a disruption of service if posts were deleted. However, you need to explain that explicitly when refusing the request or only partly fulfilling it. Otherwise, nope. That's why XF by default only anonimizes user provided data, but not user generated data - both are still personal data. See post #42.

In case of Google and co, it would be probably pretty difficult for them to argue that deleting user-generated content would disrupt their service. Take for example @eva2000's Google group - how would deleting user-generated content disrupt Google's service? Yea, it would make your discussion group a bit useless, but you are not Google and Google does have the resources to fulfill that request.
And as I said, that was possible pre GDPR already. So I assume there was indeed something like data portability and right to be forgotten, but I'm not sure about that.
 

trapped_soul

Well-known member
Was interesting discussion and was actually following and reading every post.....

Until GDPR was thrown in. Then I thought TLDR. :sneaky:

But forums won't die, your community will. :rolleyes::X3:

That is because you or your forum software provider didn't include ABC in it's core, 3rd party dev features or whatever feature reach content or application etc.
It will fail if you don't specifically apply what your niche needs.

What your niche needs is down to you, not the S/W.
So be original, think outside the box and do something different and something creative.

You do that?

Tell me the secret as I'm in ;):censored::LOL:
 

tommydamic68

Well-known member
I wrote this over a year ago, since then my forum activity has dropped significantly with very little activity, the google ads no longer support my hosting fees so as I feared then, I will most likely have to go to a shared hosting plan. On a good note, I guess, my Facebook group has grown to 8000+ members and is lively on a daily basis. Anyone else forums suffering in this day and age?
 
Facebook is centralised hell. I would never have any project or business of mine running solely at the discretion and on the terms of corporate overlords. Fortunately for me, in my niche, this is a common sentiment.

What happens to your (general, not OP specifically) thriving community you have spent years building when Facebook decides to change how Groups work or drops the forums feature, or is banned in a country where there is significant userbase, or is replaced for next big thing as MySpace was before it? Hypotheticals of course, but enough to never make me feel comfortable putting all of my eggs in to Zucks basket.

Your distributed community seems like a good idea, OP, I suppose that many wouldn't have the fanbase to be able to spread the content so thin.
 
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Deathstarr

Well-known member
Certain forums will always be around or related website because all content is not allowed on facebook even though we keep the groups going. Zuckerburg is high profile now but in a few more years facebook will be the old social sites like yahoo groups. They will eventually fail to get what people want and start to demise its going to take a long time but it will happen.

Do you remember AOL in the 90s had everything, forums, chat rooms, news, groups, all integrated in one place. All you needed was AOL. Now look at them today. Many have said and I will agree, one platform can not be all things to every person. There were social media sites before twitter, facebook, myspace but no one really used them before myspace. As a parent my kid will prob never make a facebook because by the time he gets to that age there will be something newer and better it just has not been made yet.
 

Robust

Well-known member
Zuckerburg is high profile now but in a few more years facebook will be the old social sites like yahoo groups. They will eventually fail to get what people want and start to demise its going to take a long time but it will happen.
This statement may be true for the US or the UK but it fails to see the popularity of Facebook in countries across the world. In those places Facebook isn't even remotely on the road to dying out.
 

Deathstarr

Well-known member
This statement may be true for the US or the UK but it fails to see the popularity of Facebook in countries across the world. In those places Facebook isn't even remotely on the road to dying out.
not yet but it will suffer eventually. It was a US thing before it made it to anywhere in the UK. Facebook started out as a school thing if you seen the movie.
It's most likely true for at least Germany as well.
time is all it will take.
 
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