Lack of interest "following the link below" phrase

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ActorMike

Active member
I know you can change the phrase for user_email_confirmation_body_html , but what exactly does "you need to confirm your account by following the link below." mean anyway? I've been using the internet since 1990, I've never heard anyway say "follow a link". I think you were confusing it with Twitter?

Definitely could cause user confusion there, the proper terminology is "click the link below"

Mike
 
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Tracy Perry

Well-known member
I know you can change the phrase for user_email_confirmation_body_html , but what exactly does "you need to confirm your account by following the link below." mean anyway? I've been using the internet since 1990, I've never heard anyway say "follow a link". I think you were confusing it with Twitter?

Definitely could cause user confusion there, the proper terminology is "click the link below"

Mike
And if it's in a web interface in a spam folder, typically "clicking the link below" will do you no good. You would have to copy the link below and paste it.
Follow the link below was pretty self explanatory to me. Follow indicates being led to a predetermined location. I guess you could just say "Please use the below provided URL (by clicking on it or pasting it into your browser address bar) to confirm your account".

As an aside - I see the use of "follow the link" frequently.
 

cellarius

Well-known member
what exactly does "you need to confirm your account by following the link below." mean anyway? I've been using the internet since 1990, I've never heard anyway say "follow a link". I think you were confusing it with Twitter?
Not a native speaker here, but we have the exact same way of saying in German, so I just googled to be sure that it's not just my contorted feeling. "follow the link" (with quotes) brings up > 69 million hits in google. So people do seem to use it quite frequently.
 
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