Earthquake in Spain

Shelley

Well-known member
#21
There's also been a lot of seismic activity along the Pacific "rim of fire" in recent months, which while stronger than normal, is the usual activity of the various tectonic plates. Hey and before you ask, I read that and don't have a degree in geology or associated fields.

Latest I've been reading on Yellowstone is the place is settling down a tad, some good news there for North Americans. Damn should never have watched the BBC's Super Volcano :(
Funny, The landscape scientists have reported is rising which means the plume underneath yellowstone is building up in pressure. Was it an horizon episode of super volcano you watched Jethro?
 

SilverCircle

Well-known member
#23
Well holy crap, I guess I'd better keep up to date on this stuff.
Should Yellowstone go off at the same scale it already did multiple times in the last 2 million years, it'll be a game over scenario for large parts of north America and would most likely change the face of our planet.

The largest Yellowstone eruption was about the scale of the Toba event - a major global disaster with the potential to threaten entire species. And the smaller ones were still strong enough to cause global consequences.

No need to be scared though. It is very unlikely that anyone of us will witness such an event.
 

Dominion

Active member
#28
Egads. I remember seeing something on TV about the Yellowstone supervolcano, but I didn't know it was due around now. (Of course, with a period of 600,000 years or so, "around now" probably has a fairly wide margin.)

I've also heard people saying the Sanriku offshore quake may be of a sort that's historically connected with Mount Fuji eruptions. I'd have to to a bit of research to be sure that's accurate, but the fact is we've seen an unusually large number of quakes in and around the city of Fujinomiya, centered right under the mountain. (Even that doesn't mean much, as the whole archipelago's been shaking like crazy since the big one.)

I grew up in a seismically stable area, so when I first came to Japan the occasional tremors took a bit of getting used to. Lately I'd become about as nonchalant about them as most Japanese people, but since the big one I noticed every little aftershock is making me jumpy again. I really feel for the people up in the Tohoku region.

And for the folks in Alicante. Shallow quakes are the worst.
 

Jethro

Well-known member
#35
Funny, The landscape scientists have reported is rising which means the plume underneath yellowstone is building up in pressure. Was it an horizon episode of super volcano you watched Jethro?
Not sure if it's the same one on horizon, we don't get that, brought a BBC documentary on the volcano that also had the dramatisation in one cool DVD deal. Tne latest I was reading from the U.S geology site was that Norris was subsiding.

Peggy, yeap underneath Yellowstone is a super volcano. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yellowstone_Caldera. Generally thermal parks are heated by underground calderas, i.e chambers of magma. The question for Yellowstone is it likely to blow, to what extent, and what consistancy is the magma. The science there is beyond my comprehension as they use big latin words and the like.

Onimua, we're more concern about Taupo (New Zealand) and Lake Toba (Indonesia). Lake Taupo is showing increased water temp which isn't a good sign.
 
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