Wikimedia sues Internet Brands

Adam Howard

Well-known member
We have Facebook, Google and Twitter for that.
Facebook is evil

Twitter is fast approaching evil.

I still love Google, although they maybe evil.

(Anything that imposes censorship on behalf of governments or 3rd party corporations or submits your information without a warrant is evil in my book)
 

D.O.A.

Well-known member
If this was a boxing match and I was a betting man I'd put my money on Jimmy Wales KO'ing Brisco in the second round.
 

craigiri

Well-known member
Interesting - some of it has to do with the size of the company. I remember sending a note to the XF guys early on that the ONLY thing IB and companies like that respect is money and power...and counseling that they pair up with some bigger entity to fight it (of course, that would mean losing some ownership).

But, heck, if they win on good terms they will have the last laugh...still, I like to play the odds, and that means fighting fire with fire.
 

erich37

Well-known member
Settlement of litigation between Internet Brands and the Wikimedia Foundation

http://blog.wikimedia.org/2013/02/15/a-victory-for-wikivoyage-and-free-knowledge/

Internet Brands branded the proposed new site an “Infringing Website” and claimed that the volunteers were acting “for the benefit of the Wikimedia Foundation” to “usurp” the community of users of Internet Brands’ site and taking actions that included “deliberately misleading statements, and Trademark infringement and violation of Internet Brands’ intellectual property rights.” Internet Brands identified the “Wikimedia Foundation, members of its Board, and other members of the Foundation” as potential “co-conspirators” who were “corrupt in this scheme”.

Internet Brands responded by abandoning its federal claim, essentially admitting it had no factual basis. The federal court then dismissed all of Internet Brands’ remaining claims.
 

Jake Bunce

XenForo moderator
Staff member
One can't help but look for parallels in this case, but it seems very different. Some key differences are:

1) Wikimedia has money.

2) IB's original lawsuit was abandoned/dismissed in the federal court, and this settlement is over a counter-suit by Wikimedia.

3) The settlement basically calls off the entire action. No money is changing hands, but Wikimedia is now free to conduct their business un-litigated.

It seems there are no damages or costs to speak of in this case. Two giants fought it out and accomplished nothing other than to achieve the allowed existence of Wikimedia which they are claiming as a victory. It really doesn't compare to the XenForo case.
 
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