XF 2.1 Logo development for a new site

Joe Kuhn

Well-known member
My new site is here

I developed my own Forum icons and am liking the graphics work so much I started looking at logos.

Since my forum theme is the translation of FoxPro programs to C#, I'm thinking of developing a logo that changes from the FoxPro logo to the C# logo one small piece at a time, either in place or side by side.

If they were side by side, the C# logo would not be visible to start with. As a small block of the FoxPro logo would disappear and, a same size block of the C# logo would appear. The pieces could be randomly chosen from each of the two logos, and eventually, the FoxPro logo would be completely gone, the C# logo completely visible. Then it would start over again after a pause.

1583698653235.png 1583698678463.png

If it was one on top of the other, I'd simply replace one piece of the Fox logo with a piece from the C# logo. Small squares come to mind.

Would like to see it both ways.

How would I do this?
 

Joe Kuhn

Well-known member
Correction, looks like the default font in the C# program editor is Consolas. This is what I see in my working environment and I have not changed it since installation. I went through all the Display items list and they're all Consolas.

1583761477534.png
 

Joe Kuhn

Well-known member
Note that "FoxPro.To(C#)" is visible from just about everywhere. Here you can see it in my icon with the blue background and in my Category Node (just above "Translation Examples").

1583762842875.png

It's also visible everywhere else in BreadCrumbs, so I'm good without the text in a logo.
 

Joe Kuhn

Well-known member
After seeing it with the text, I'm definitely on board with it. I like the second to last one because the word "FoxPro" in the FoxPro font is right above the Fox. Then it goes right to Consolas. Very nice. Wow.

Interesting you put the text above the graphics. I was going to put it underneath, but the site title needs to be on top. Yes. I now have a great looking logo. Personal Message sent.
 

Joe Kuhn

Well-known member
I'd see what it looks like if you drop the ".com" from the text. Like so:

FoxPro To C Sharp

Maybe?
Mm. I kind of like the ".com" included. First attempt at a forum 2 years ago, I couldn't get the ".com" name, so I'm pretty happy I got it this time. Also got:

FoxToCSharp.com

VFPToCSharp.com

but had to pay extra for 'em.

Second from the top looks the best to me now that I've had a break and come back to it. The text spacing is more uniform. Maybe move the text a little to the left.
 

bzcomputers

Well-known member
Here it is without the .com. It's always a cleaner look without full urls in a logo. The majority of websites don't include the actual url or domain extension in the logo. But it's your site and your call.

sample-set-4.jpg
 

Manster54

Well-known member
Now I think I would come up with a snazzy slogan to put under the image, one that explains what your site is about or who you're trying to cater to. Something like "Your home for blah blah blah" or such.

Might even consider a 2px bar above and below it all too, tucked in nice and tight.
 

Joe Kuhn

Well-known member
My statement of purpose (which may need revising as well):

The purpose of this discussion forum is to share solutions to the problem of translating FoxPro programs, in all versions, to C#.

I use it as an index of key word translations as in: "How do I translate the Fox function SYS(2015)?"

We're here to share solutions to the problem at hand at the keyword level, the environment level and the data level.
 

Joe Kuhn

Well-known member
The only way I've been able to manage it is to test everything with re-usable tests. So when you make changes, your earlier tests prove you haven't wrecked anything. You move forward a piece at a time. However big or small required. Some of it is simple, you just copy the lines over and change the variable names to fit the new standard your shop uses. Sometimes it's a functional translation where you make the new code work the way the old code use to work, but NOT line by line because the differences are just too great. This is when C# texts become important. Hence I have a forum for C# book/references.

Sometimes I'll step through the code on both sides watching to see what happens differently in my new program compared to the original.

Sometimes I write tests for the old program so I know how it works and then write tests for the new code to show the results are the same.

Other times I've had to dig into the output of the old program to find something to compare to. Eventually the pieces start to come together.

Code often repeats as in logging errors or accessing data and scanning through the results one record at a time. Those are pieces you can re-write and test separately. They'll get re-used over and over again. Find this low hanging fruit early and leverage your effort.

Before you know it, you've got thousands of lines of code translated and working in a way you KNOW is valid because you've tested it all. Skip a test and pay later. You will pay later. I've tried to skip tests and it's not pretty. You live and die by your tests.

Get the idea?
 
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Manster54

Well-known member
Statement of purpose needs work.
It's not bad. I don't know enough about the subject material to comment on it, but generally I try to keep mission statements/website purpose statements brief and compelling - compelling in a way that makes the reader want to know more. A well-constructed single paragraph on it can be both digestable and compelling.
 

Manster54

Well-known member
Here's a start for an opener.

"At FoxProToCSharp we collaborate and share solutions to the problem of translating FoxPro programs, all versions, to C# at the keyword level, the environment level and the data level."

I'd go on briefly to say how successful we've been, a tidbit of what we've learned, and a "hook" saying how we can help you too. And we welcome your help and contributions too. And stuff.
 

Joe Kuhn

Well-known member
I'd like to accept anything on topic. If it has to do with translating from this one language to the other, including data, it's welcome. It's that simple.
 
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Joe Kuhn

Well-known member
Here it is without the .com. It's always a cleaner look without full urls in a logo. The majority of websites don't include the actual url or domain extension in the logo. But it's your site and your call.

View attachment 220226
Spinning off your last attachment, here's yet another option:

"FoxPro" (fox logo) "to" (C# logo) "CSharp"

Put the logos in place of the arrows. This would take up less vertical space allowing more content to be seen without scrolling.
 
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