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XF 1.5 18k Internal links nofollow how to fix that?

fionix

Active member
#1
Hi,

Even that SEO is not important to you than I'm in the process to fix all issues with FX SEO vise.

So there are 18k No Follow internal links, I tried with the Add-on here on the XF forum that claim to remove them, however, it seems only to apply to new links / threads & posts.

Is there a way to remove the "nofollow" tag/attribute from the links?

7k Images have no ALT tag, can this be fixed somehow? maybe a SQL statement or something that put a ALT tag on all image files it finds or something?
 

fionix

Active member
#3
yeah it's really a great tool.. if you know how to use it :D I have played around with it, but I'm sadly not so good in database language.
 

adwade

Active member
#4
I agree completely! However, in the discussion of the add-on there are a lot of Q&A's similar to your inquiry. You might try posting there and see if someone smarter than us can show you the light. ;)
 

fionix

Active member
#5
honestly, I don't believe this plugin has any support and it seems no one there around is knowing what how to use it and the people that know are not posting there :D But thanks anyway..
 

Tracy Perry

Well-known member
#6
honestly, I don't believe this plugin has any support and it seems no one there around is knowing what how to use it and the people that know are not posting there :D But thanks anyway..
It's simple regex.. if you aren't good with regex expressions, then you aren't going to have much luck with it.
 

fionix

Active member
#9
Well, I know so much, I need to find all the 18,000 links that have an NOFOLLOW attribute and change it to DOFOLLOW - that's it, but I don't know what to do and how to find them and replace the attribute.
 

Tracy Perry

Well-known member
#10
Well, I know so much, I need to find all the 18,000 links that have an NOFOLLOW attribute and change it to DOFOLLOW - that's it, but I don't know what to do and how to find them and replace the attribute.
I think this is an example of what it looks like now
Code:
<a href="http://xenforo.com" rel="nofollow">XenForo - Compelling Community Forum Software</a>
So your regex (which I'm not that great at) will need to strip the rel="nofollow" out of them. Maybe @Jake Bunce can give an idea. I am not sure if you have to replace it with "dofollow" or just strip it.
 

fionix

Active member
#11
Thank you very much, let's hope someone can post how to do that.. it seems indeed easy for someone that is good at Regex.. I wonder why no one has made an add-on for this and some of the other issues.. this is really useful for SEO and I think people are not aware of it. At least not the small forums around.. the big forums may have sorted this out already or don't care because Google love them anyway!
 

Tracy Perry

Well-known member
#12
this is really useful for SEO and I think people are not aware of it. At least not the small forums around.. the big forums may have sorted this out already or don't care because Google love them anyway!
Probably because most want it as no-follow. As for SEO, your site doesn't get the benefit of it - the target site does.
As we discussed earlier, the natural do follow form of links is used by Google to measure PageRank. More links means more link juice, which results in higher ranking website pages. In its unadulterated state, PageRank exists to see what pages are the most popular (and therefore, likely the best quality pages), and deliver those top pages to searchers.

Well, ours is an imperfect world, and, as you might have heard, some self-proclaimed SEO “experts” scheme to trick search engines and inflate their rankings using black-hat, unethical methods, and in the times before the nofollow attribute, link-building was an easy way to artificially boost page rankings.



Once PageRank was discovered by SEO black-hats, all hell broke lose! Suddenly it was all about the links for SEO. More inbound links meant better PageRank, and SEOs were determined to get as many links possible, even if it meant spamming everyone on the web to get them. Blog comments were a joke, riddled with self-promotional nonsense and linking gibberish.
Is a pretty good description why it was done that way I imagine.
 
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fionix

Active member
#13
hmmm, if you're right all is fine, however, SEMrush say this:

About this issue: The rel="nofollow" attribute is an element in an <a> tag that tells crawlers not to follow the link (e.g., "<a href="http://example.com/link" rel="nofollow">Nofollow link
example</a>")."Nofollow" links don’t pass any link juice to referred webpages. That’s why it is not recommended that you use nofollow attributes in internal links. You should let link juice
flow freely throughout your website. Moreover, unintentional use of nofollow attributes may result in your webpage being ignored by search engine crawlers even if it contains a valuable
content. How to fix: Make sure not to use nofollow attributes by mistake. Remove them from <a> tags, if necessary.
 

Tracy Perry

Well-known member
#14
As I said (which that you quote reinforces) it only helps with the referred to site's SEO, not yours. That's why it was so badly abused by spammers. They got link juice from spamming their URL's to other sites.

Here's a little more on the article I read
As a webmaster, you might find yourself wondering when to use the no follow attribute and when to allow for do follow links. No follow links primarily belong in:

  • Paid links (it wouldn’t be fair to buy link juice, now would it?)
  • Comments
  • Forums
  • Anything involving what Google calls “untrusted content”
Some webmaster may disable the nofollow attribute as a reward for blog commenters who are contributing to the blogging community or online discussion, but that’s up to individual discretion.