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Should I install Zend Sever CE instead of Apache?

kingston

Well-known member
#1
I am just starting to look into working with Zend for a project, and it seems as if maybe I will get some performance enhancements if I install Zend Server CE on my host and run Xenforo off that instead of Apache?

Thoughts?
 
R

ragtek

Guest
#10
I have a huge problem with my server under heavy load. Is that any different than apc?
1. check & analyse your server and try to find the bottleneck.
In 70% of the cases where people talk about performance problems, they have a vps without knowing how to use it..... :p
They don't know how to optimize the network,apache, mysql,etc...

My 0.02$
 

kingston

Well-known member
#11
1. check & analyse your server and try to find the bottleneck.
In 70% of the cases where people talk about performance problems, they have a vps without knowing how to use it..... :p
They don't know how to optimize the network,apache, mysql,etc...

My 0.02$
I have been trying for months but I can't figure out what the bottleneck exactly is. I have my suspicions. There are only 5 times a year when our traffic gets that high (it increases 30 fold for about 6 hours). I can get to the server itself ok and there is no problem (so I don't believe we are running out of bandwidth). I am able to make changes in the admin page decently fast (you can tell there is a bit of slowdown, but not as bad). The actual pages themselves can take 10-15 seconds to load. I have tried APC, mod_pagespeed, increasing memory, decreasing allowed connections (and increasing). I just added a second CPU to the machine, so it got a bit better, but brute forcing through a bottleneck doesnt seem smart. PHP, the webserver, or MySQL are the possible bottlenecks I am guessing (the bandwidth is huge and the machine has 4 gig of RAM and now 2 CPU's).

Any advice you can give will be welcome. I am not against digging and looking, but I have no idea what I am looking for.
 

Luke F

Well-known member
#12
1. check & analyse your server and try to find the bottleneck.
In 70% of the cases where people talk about performance problems, they have a vps without knowing how to use it..... :p
They don't know how to optimize the network,apache, mysql,etc...

My 0.02$
Pretty much this, but using Apache on a VPS (or any server for that matter) is shooting yourself in the foot
 

CyclingTribe

Well-known member
#13
Disable ALL mods too. I had a mod that was adding upto 2 seconds to the index page load time!!

Also, work on only one element to optimise it, then move to the next one. It may take months (it did me) but the effort is worth it. I worked through MySQL, PHP, Apache2 and shaved five seconds off the average page load time.

Have you also looked at "ExpiresActive" for Apache? You can set specific page elements to be cached for longer on your visitors browsers, so images are loaded once then don't expire again for say 1 week or 30 days, which not only saves you bandwidth (because you don't have to constantly re-serve the file) but speeds up page loading too because it is loaded locally from the users browser cache.

There are lots of similar tips and tricks you can pick up if you dig around - and I wrote about some of the changes I made to improve the speed of my IPB forums here which may be of help.

There's also another thread discussing various things you can optimise, here.

You could also serve static content from a cookieless domain, so that images/css/etc. can be loaded simultaneously with other content (like creating two data streams [that's very over simplified but you get the idea]).

Good luck with it, whichever platform you end up on. But just change a few things at a time and don't rush it. (y)

Cheers,
Shaun :D
 

kingston

Well-known member
#15
Disable ALL mods too. I had a mod that was adding upto 2 seconds to the index page load time!!

Also, work on only one element to optimise it, then move to the next one. It may take months (it did me) but the effort is worth it. I worked through MySQL, PHP, Apache2 and shaved five seconds off the average page load time.

Have you also looked at "ExpiresActive" for Apache? You can set specific page elements to be cached for longer on your visitors browsers, so images are loaded once then don't expire again for say 1 week or 30 days, which not only saves you bandwidth (because you don't have to constantly re-serve the file) but speeds up page loading too because it is loaded locally from the users browser cache.

There are lots of similar tips and tricks you can pick up if you dig around - and I wrote about some of the changes I made to improve the speed of my IPB forums here which may be of help.

There's also another thread discussing various things you can optimise, here.

You could also serve static content from a cookieless domain, so that images/css/etc. can be loaded simultaneously with other content (like creating two data streams [that's very over simplified but you get the idea]).

Good luck with it, whichever platform you end up on. But just change a few things at a time and don't rush it. (y)

Cheers,
Shaun :D
I would let them enabled and check the query time in debugmod^^
So it's IMHO much easier to find the mods causing the problems
I have tried disabling all of them during our busy periods. It works better for a period, but still slows down.
 

CyclingTribe

Well-known member
#17
I have tried disabling all of them during our busy periods. It works better for a period, but still slows down.
Have a look at those threads I pointed you to - there's some good optimisation advice in there. :)

[Question for XF mods: Would it be okay to turn this into a server optimisation thread (posting ini/config files etc.)?]

Cheers,
Shaun :D
 

User

Well-known member
#18
1. check & analyse your server and try to find the bottleneck.
In 70% of the cases where people talk about performance problems, they have a vps without knowing how to use it..... :p
They don't know how to optimize the network,apache, mysql,etc...
I couldn't agree more. I moved from a managed VPS to an unmanaged one (on linode) and while I now only pay 1/3 of what I was paying before the fact that it is unmanaged really starts to bug me a bit. There really was a lot of value in me being able to just call up, get Level 3 North American based support 24/7 and say "hey, this doesn't work right, what's up?" and they would fix it or optimize it.

Moses on here suggested vpsbible.com as a resource to learn about how to manage VPS installs effectively. It does indeed look like a very valuable resource. However, at the end of the day time is one's most precious asset and the savings I achieved by going to unmanaged may not actually be worth it as I am burning way too much time working it myself. I may go back to my old host.
 

kingston

Well-known member
#19
So I finally got php-fpm, nginx, and apc running. I have a couple questions.

What should my keepalive timeout be? 0?
APC memory size?
Max SQL connections?
Max memory size for php?

I have 4 gig and 2 core duo processors. Should my working processes be higher than 4?
 

CyclingTribe

Well-known member
#20
So I finally got php-fpm, nginx, and apc running. I have a couple questions.

What should my keepalive timeout be? 0?
APC memory size?
Max SQL connections?
Max memory size for php?

I have 4 gig and 2 core duo processors. Should my working processes be higher than 4?
Try these and see how you get on:

Keepalive 1-3 seconds.
APC try 512MB
Max SQL connections - I have this set to 300, but use tuning-primer.sh to get the figure for your max. connections to date and see what that is. If it's higher go for 500.
PHP memory_limit = 128M (for my setup anyway).

Cheers,
Shaun :D