LulzSec goes on hacking rampage against game sites

Digital Doctor

Well-known member
scientology.youtube.jpg
 

Digital Doctor

Well-known member
Great BBC 13 min video on Jake Davis.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-22526021

I love the guy.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2013/may/17/lulzsec-hackers-locked-up

Jake Davis has been jailed for 24 months for his part in masterminding cyber-attacks on major global institutions.

For lawmakers, illicit downloaders and hackers alike, the internet is one of the few bits of frontier territory left in the world: for the "rogues" there's lots more scope to get away with things not possible in more civilized, everyday reality, while for the lawmakers there's an ungovernable mess.

The problem with frontier justice is, of course, that when it strikes, it tends to be rough. And so it's proved for the four members of the hacking group LulzSec, sentenced in a London court: three were jailed for between two years and 32 months (they'll serve half), with the fourth receiving a suspended 20-month sentence.

===

lulzsec.topiary.2.years.jail.jpg

2 years jail time is definitely overzealous prosecution.
 

ManagerJosh

Well-known member
Why? What they did was illegal, and could have potentially crippled businesses.

Whether or not you agree with the way these businesses generate their money is not the issue here. The issue is that their acts were illegal.

Not everything is black and white. I seem to recall at one point Lulzsec had a browser 0-day that when you visited the website, it loaded an instance of ion cannon onto your computer, and then blasted a random target.
 

SchmitzIT

Well-known member
Not everything is black and white. I seem to recall at one point Lulzsec had a browser 0-day that when you visited the website, it loaded an instance of ion cannon onto your computer, and then blasted a random target.

That basically means they made unsuspecting people complicit in their crimes. How is that not black or white, exactly?

ORLY ? Crippled ? Please.

This is criminal activity [here]
This is script kiddie activity [here]

I think you should prosecute 6.2 billion dollar frauds vs. $5000

Did you read your own link? The JP Morgan guy *is* being prosecuted. In a court of law, by a jury of peers.

I'm not sure why you put up a straw man argument that makes it sound as if I favor cracking down on script kiddies rather than fraudulent bankers. I merely stated that these kids broke the law. If they get sentenced because of that, they have no one to blame than themselves.

And yes, DDOS attacks can and have crippled businesses in the past. And rather than a jury determining guilt, in the case of script kiddies, it's a bunch of guys (and sometimes girls) who abuse technology they probably don't even understand to target whoever THEY deem is the bad guy.

What if they determine YOU're it? Who's going to stand up for you when your website, which could very well be the way you put bread on the table for your kids and family, is taken down? Or would you in that case also point at the JP Morgan guy and tell the cops to go get that dude first, and pat these guys on the back for their "prank"?
 

SchmitzIT

Well-known member
From an investigation standpoint, how do you prove that there was an intend to do harm? :)

Are you asking from the perspective of the unsuspecting users, or lulzsec?

In case of the former, there's no intent to do harm. They simply got tricked, and I would assume that these people would walk free, if they'd be at all prosecuted.

In the case of lulzsec, I'd say it's pretty obvious that them pushing software onto other people's machines is one count of illegal activities, and then using these "bots" to assist in a DDOS attack is another.
 

ManagerJosh

Well-known member
Are you asking from the perspective of the unsuspecting users, or lulzsec?

In case of the former, there's no intent to do harm. They simply got tricked, and I would assume that these people would walk free, if they'd be at all prosecuted.

In the case of lulzsec, I'd say it's pretty obvious that them pushing software onto other people's machines is one count of illegal activities, and then using these "bots" to assist in a DDOS attack is another.

I am asking from a law enforcement/prosecution point of view :).
 

Code Monkey

Well-known member
Just more pricks that think that whatever they feel is right is right. Doesn't matter to them who they hurt. Makes no difference if they are hackers or sitting in a board room. They're all the same.
 
Top