LulzSec goes on hacking rampage against game sites

Pereira

Well-known member
The guy that was arrested in my own country looks like a complete loner and has supposedly won many public computer programming competitions, all before he turned 18. Some of these guys are even being done for some of the most heinous crimes on the internet such as downloading illegal images.

DDoS and SQL inject a few big brand sites etc.... come up with a slogan and icon... get mentioned in the media... use this publicity to further a hot political topic... fallout with each other... forget to protect their IP... get caught... help the authorities get the others caught = self destruction.

...and they still get some sort of heroic pat on the back by some? :rolleyes:

Can anyone name me one thing they have achieved other than making complete fools of themselves?
 

Digital Doctor

Well-known member
Can anyone name me one thing they have achieved
They exposed the Church of Scientology as the corrupt cult it is.
They also highlighted the extremely poor cyber security out there.
It helped educate America that it's digital infrastructure is insecure and being pwned by Chinese hackers daily.
They probably did some wrongs but overall they were a useful part of the internet, despite 4chan !




anonops.blogspot.com guy too
anon.guy.jpg
 

Digital Doctor

Well-known member
Interesting article here.

http://www.foxnews.com/scitech/2012/03/06/exclusive-unmasking-worlds-most-wanted-hacker/

The nondescript public housing unit seemed an unlikely nerve center for one of the world’s most wanted criminal masterminds, but the 28-year-old Monsegur himself is a study in such contradictions. An unemployed computer programmer, welfare recipient and legal guardian of two young children, Monsegur did not go to college and is a self-taught hacker. Although his skills and intellect could command a lucrative salary in the private sector, those who know him say he is lazy, an underachiever complacent with his lifestyle.

Sabu had always been cautious, hiding his Internet protocol address through proxy servers. But then just once he slipped. He logged into an Internet relay chatroom from his own IP address without masking it. All it took was once. The feds had a fix on him.

He must be pissed.
He should have wrote a mirc script to avoid that !

Other interesting notes:
Monsegur worked at Limewire.
He has 2 kids.

hector.xavier.monsegur.sabu.lulzsec.jpg


I'll be mortified if he does any jail time.
I would make him get rid of that ear ring.

I wonder what IRC client he used.
:)
 

Taylor J

Well-known member
Interesting article here.

http://www.foxnews.com/scitech/2012/03/06/exclusive-unmasking-worlds-most-wanted-hacker/

The nondescript public housing unit seemed an unlikely nerve center for one of the world’s most wanted criminal masterminds, but the 28-year-old Monsegur himself is a study in such contradictions. An unemployed computer programmer, welfare recipient and legal guardian of two young children, Monsegur did not go to college and is a self-taught hacker. Although his skills and intellect could command a lucrative salary in the private sector, those who know him say he is lazy, an underachiever complacent with his lifestyle.

Sabu had always been cautious, hiding his Internet protocol address through proxy servers. But then just once he slipped. He logged into an Internet relay chatroom from his own IP address without masking it. All it took was once. The feds had a fix on him.

He must be pissed.
He should have wrote a mirc script to avoid that !

Other interesting notes:
Monsegur worked at Limewire.
He has 2 kids.

View attachment 26754

I'll be mortified if he does any jail time.
I would make him get rid of that ear ring.

I wonder what IRC client he used.
:)

Why would he be pissed? He's been helping out the FBI, in their own offices, for almost 9 months.
 

Pereira

Well-known member
They exposed the Church of Scientology as the corrupt cult it is.
They also highlighted the extremely poor cyber security out there.
It helped educate America that it's digital infrastructure is insecure and being pwned by Chinese hackers daily.
They probably did some wrongs but overall they were a useful part of the internet, despite 4chan !
1. This wasn't already known?
2. It has and always will be poor in the internets current state.
3. It's entirely subjective that its made any impact, for example, to the way people use their credit card info online.
4. I don't understand what has been "useful" about them.
 

Digital Doctor

Well-known member
You would still have this view if your information was in the possession of this guy, then posted online?
What information ? You mean if I was a client at Stratfor ?

50,277 Unique Credit Card Numbers, of which 9,651 are not expired. Many credit cards are re-issued, and many credit card processors do not check the expiration date. Consequently, more than 9,651 credit card holders may still be at risk.
86,594 email addresses, of which 47,680 are unique.
27,537 phone numbers, of which 25,680 are unique.
44,188 encrypted passwords, of which roughly half could be easily cracked.

I think people were inconvenienced. You don't find it odd that a company whom pretends to be and expert organization can't keep their own website secure ? I suspect Chinese hackers rooted them years ago ... but just didn't tell anyone. That's alot more dangerous than Anonymous bragging about the hack.
 

SchmitzIT

Well-known member
DD, with all respect, but when it comes to security, there is only one single rule. One side always need to be right. The other side only need to be lucky once.

Most of these so-called 'leet'-hackers are nothing but script kiddies, using the intellectual fruits of other people's labor to cause havoc on teh interwebs. They only manage to break into systems because someone else pretty much made it possible to do so with only one click. Change 1 single little aspect of the security, and 99% of them would be totally clueless.

In this case, the feds had a lucky break, though if you truly believe that using proxies is enough to keep you shielded from accountability, you'd be in for quite a surprise if you'd use proxies to hide illegal activities.

And while I agree with you that people need to be made aware of exactly what the risks are when they go online, there's better ways to do so then by breaking into companies and then carelessly dumping the information gained into the wild, or, as apparently some of these guys did, using it for personal financial gain. Real useful stuff, that.


With that said, I do agree with you there's bigger things to worry about.
 

John

Well-known member
I find it not in the least bit ironic that their "leader" was railing against the system yet he was living on public assistance because, as the fed's put it, he was too lazy to work a real job. Just re-enforces my view of the entitlement class (ie; the OWS'ers).

 

Fred Sherman

Well-known member
The ends does not justify the means. No hack is harmless. When they are caught, they should all do the maximum sentence allowed by law and face civil suits from those they've damaged. Effectively take their freedom away for as long as possible and guarantee that every dollar they earn for life goes to their victims.
 

Digital Doctor

Well-known member
Interesting article here.

http://www.foxnews.com/scitech/2012/03/06/exclusive-unmasking-worlds-most-wanted-hacker/

Sabu had always been cautious, hiding his Internet protocol address through proxy servers. But then just once he slipped. He logged into an Internet relay chatroom from his own IP address without masking it. All it took was once. The feds had a fix on him.

http://th3j35t3r.wordpress.com/2011/06/25/lulzsecs-cloudflare-configuration/


At the same time…

the truly doxed ‘leader’ of lulzsec (SABU aka @anonymousabu) forgot about his personal domain ‘PRVT.ORG’ and the fact that it was due for renewal, it auto-renewed anyway, but the domain privacy didn’t. – And Abu was to busy trolling the trolls trolling him to remember.
The connection between Sabu and PRVT.ORG is already widely documented:
Here’s the new WHOIS as of yesterday.
and here’s a pastebin just in case: http://t.co/1lmFj0d
And a dump:
Domain ID:D87859570-LROR
Domain Name:pRVT.ORG
Created On:25-Jun-2002 16:38:43 UTC
Last Updated On:26-Jun-2011 01:23:02 UTC
Expiration Date:25-Jun-2012 16:43:58 UTC
Sponsoring Registrar:GoDaddy.com, Inc. (R91-LROR)
Status:CLIENT DELETE PROHIBITED
Status:CLIENT RENEW PROHIBITED
Status:CLIENT TRANSFER PROHIBITED
Status:CLIENT UPDATE PROHIBITED
Status:AUTORENEWPERIOD
Registrant ID:CR25623846
Registrant Name:hector monsegur
Registrant Street1:90 avenue d #f
Registrant Street2:
Registrant Street3:
Registrant City:new york
Registrant State/Province:NY
Registrant Postal Code:10009
Registrant Country:US
Registrant Phone:+1.9173889070
Registrant Phone Ext.:
Registrant FAX:
Registrant FAX Ext.:
Registrant Email:xavier@openplans.org
Admin ID:CR25623848
Admin Name:hector monsegur
Admin Street1:90 avenue d #f
Admin Street2:
Admin Street3:
Admin City:new york
Admin State/Province:NY
Admin Postal Code:10009
Admin Country:US
Admin Phone:+1.9173889070
Admin Phone Ext.:
Admin FAX:
Admin FAX Ext.:
Admin Email:xavier@openplans.org
Tech ID:CR25623847
Tech Name:hector monsegur
Tech Street1:90 avenue d #f
Tech Street2:
Tech Street3:
Tech City:new york
Tech State/Province:NY
Tech Postal Code:10009
Tech Country:US
Tech Phone:+1.9173889070
Tech Phone Ext.:
Tech FAX:
Tech FAX Ext.:
Tech Email:xavier@openplans.org
Name Server:NS77.DOMAINCONTROL.COM
Name Server:NS78.DOMAINCONTROL.COM
Name Server:
Name Server:
Name Server:
Name Server:
Name Server:
Name Server:
Name Server:
Name Server:
Name Server:
Name Server:
Name Server:
DNSSEC:Unsigned
Nuff Said. See you next time.
Hmmm .... seems like th3j35t3r had better proof that Sabu was prvt.org which was Hector Monsegur.
Interesting.
 

Digital Doctor

Well-known member
Another Lulzsec member is Tango Down.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-19409205

'Lulzsec hacker' latest to be arrested in US

A man suspected of being a member of hacking group Lulzsec has been arrested in the US, the FBI has said.

Raynaldo Rivera, 20, is accused of being involved in hacks on Sony Pictures in May and June last year, in which thousands of personal details were published online.

If convicted, he could face up to 15 years in prison.

The FBI alleged he had worked with Cody Kretsinger, a 24-year-old who pleaded guilty to hacking charges in April.

Lulzsec, an off-shoot of the Anonymous hacking collective, gained notoriety last year with a string of high-profile attacks on websites and businesses.

In the Sony hack, which the company said had cost it $600,000 (£380,000), people who had entered competitions had their personal details exposed on the internet.

Cost $600,000 ? as if.
 

SchmitzIT

Well-known member
Cost $600,000 ? as if.

Don't underestimate how quickly costs run up in such cases. You need to dedicate staff to figuring out what happened, take the site offline (which amounts for lost revenue), allocate resources for the replacement site, put staff on getting the new site up and running securely, , there's all the action required to be taken as damage control, probably lawyers getting involved, etc. etc.

I'm not surprised at that number, really. I don't recall how long the Sony site was down, but it probably was several days. Several days of lost revenue from gamers pumping money arounbd quickly adds up.
 

BlackJacket

Well-known member
What I find disturbing is that the United States doesnt have a group or small army of these guys testing our own infrastructure as well as hacking other countries. Fighting on foot is no longer the means to end a war...
 

Jaxel

Well-known member
What I find disturbing is that the United States doesnt have a group or small army of these guys testing our own infrastructure as well as hacking other countries. Fighting on foot is no longer the means to end a war...
Conspiracy theorists would say we do...
 
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