• This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn more.

Listen to the Novice folks

Finnigan

Active member
#1
Hey,
I just wanted to re-iterate that coders and designers should listen to Novice folk and all their questions, often repeated questions. I'm seeing a trend here to cater more towards advanced knowledge which I think is an absolute huge mistake. A large majority of web dev companies are moving past having to know code (css included) and more towards a point and click system, especially for design options. And I'm sorry but having to add CSS to templates isn't the answer in the least-IMHO. Keep the point and click system, keep boxes for padding, margins, text options, borders-so that the novice user can click on the items right where they are, rather than having to go back to the templates (if they even know which template to use without having to come here and ask) and add several lines of CSS. I'm sorry to say but the CSS direction is NOT the answer. CSS is no easier than html for the novice person.

Respectfully submitted,

Finn
 

ManagerJosh

Well-known member
#3
Hey,
I just wanted to re-iterate that coders and designers should listen to Novice folk and all their questions, often repeated questions. I'm seeing a trend here to cater more towards advanced knowledge which I think is an absolute huge mistake. A large majority of web dev companies are moving past having to know code (css included) and more towards a point and click system, especially for design options. And I'm sorry but having to add CSS to templates isn't the answer in the least-IMHO. Keep the point and click system, keep boxes for padding, margins, text options, borders-so that the novice user can click on the items right where they are, rather than having to go back to the templates (if they even know which template to use without having to come here and ask) and add several lines of CSS. I'm sorry to say but the CSS direction is NOT the answer. CSS is no easier than html for the novice person.

Respectfully submitted,

Finn
However it's the same CSS that enables responsive designs, and evolution in what your users' expect in terms of the user experience.
 
#4
However it's the same CSS that enables responsive designs, and evolution in what your users' expect in terms of the user experience.
My thoughts exactly. The web is literally powered by HTML and CSS, it's the backbone of the web. You can't have a professional website without the use of HTML and CSS. All of the drag and drop page builders still use CSS and HTML, but do it behind the scenes. And I'm not sure if you've ever looked at the source code for them, but usually it's an absolute mess. Part of Google's SEO rankings rely on code quality and in my experience they don't have the same quality.

Both HTML & CSS are relatively easy to learn. They aren't programming languages that rely on any type of logic. They are static, and resources are readily available on the internet for free. I'm 100% self taught, and have learned by doing it. And the added benefit is that you aren't limited to what you can do with it as you are with a page builder. We've had clients that attempted to use them to build their own sites, and they come to us because they can't always accomplish what they want without help from a web dev team.

A large majority of web dev companies are moving past having to know code (css included)
This absolutely isn't true. There's a lot of companies that use the drag and drop systems, but there are far more that specialize in unique, professional websites that just can't be accomplished without a knowledge of HTML/CSS and even a heavy dose of JS.