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Gmail says: We believe your account was recently accessed from: Indonesia 202.152.202.84

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by Digital Doctor, May 9, 2012.

  1. Digital Doctor

    Digital Doctor Well-Known Member

    Y U No leave my Gmail alone ?

    indonesia.IP.address.jpg

    Cool Gmail feature though :)
     
  2. duderuud

    duderuud Active Member

    Is that a new feature or is it the first time you had something like this?
     
  3. Digital Doctor

    Digital Doctor Well-Known Member

    First time.
     
  4. guiltar

    guiltar Well-Known Member

    Same thing happened some time ago :(
     
  5. Digital Doctor

    Digital Doctor Well-Known Member

    Gmail say they "prevented it".
    gmail.prevented.hijacker.jpg
     
  6. Russ

    Russ Well-Known Member

    I had same thing happen to me from China, I went ahead and put on the double access security, sends a text to my cell phone to get in.

    At first I thought it was an advert
     
  7. SchmitzIT

    SchmitzIT Well-Known Member

    Mine was accessed from Asia at some point as well. Check your "sent mail". In my case, they sent out fake WOW mails.

    No idea how they ever got a hold of my password, but yeah.
     
  8. Adam Howard

    Adam Howard Well-Known Member

  9. Adam Howard

    Adam Howard Well-Known Member



    My passwords are typically 50+ characters (longer usually) mixed with letters, numbers, symbols (and spaces to if possible). I've used whole paragraphs & chapter phrases from books mixed with numbers & symbols too.

    Key point is NOT to use the same password in important places.
     
  10. Adam Howard

    Adam Howard Well-Known Member

    Just changed away from using this, so I could provide a good example (ie...no longer in use)

    I took this

    And had used this as a password

     
  11. Edrondol

    Edrondol Well-Known Member

    That's great until I try and type it in using my iPod. Then I just melt down and cry as passersby point and stare.
     
    SchmitzIT and TheVisitors like this.
  12. Floris

    Floris Guest

    Get 1password, it's for windows, mac, ios, etc. Syncs over dropbox, use it constantly. Unique passwords for every login, and as long as the service allows. I never type any passwords anymore.

    And of course, any security question is unique if possible, and the answer is never the truth, the answer should be as long and complex as the password (and also unique).
     
    TheVisitors and Coop1979 like this.
  13. Edrondol

    Edrondol Well-Known Member

    I had a password thing for my iPod. I kept everything in there. SSNs, VIN numbers for vehicles. You name it and it was in there. Last OS update erased them all. Let's just say I'm a bit leery about keeping passwords in a cloud for this reason and the reason that I can't be entirely sure of the security. You'd think places would have good security, but then you hear about Twitter, Sony, PayPal, Microsoft India, Facebook....
     
    TheVisitors likes this.
  14. bambua

    bambua Well-Known Member

    That is good up until the point where you consistently use the same letter/number/symbol to replace the same letter. Anytime you add ANY point of consistency to a password you increase the likely hood it can be cracked. In that situation a longer password is actually worse because it gives them more points of comparison. Once I learn that 7h3 = the, I can deduce that 7h1$ = this and I'm off and running. Put this at the speed that a computer can think and it's cracked in no time. Letter substitutions are one of the worst passwords, and often the most recommended.

    A password like e#J"_81jN is actually better than what you posted.
     
  15. Floris

    Floris Guest

    If you sync over dropbox it wouldn't matter. You can get all your systems stolen. You buy a new one, install it, tell it to sync over dropbox, and you get it back again. Change the master password and move forward.

    Most mobile security apps store everything plain text, 1password guys understand crypto, privacy and security and are constantly improving on it.

    But by all means, especially since all those big sites are so poorly behaving in their responsibilities (Sony, hello 22 times?) it's perhaps a good idea to NOT use a single short easy to guess pass on ALL these sites.
     
  16. Floris

    Floris Guest

    haystacking passwords is even more secure than that. . What he's using is predictable and part of huge dictionary files. Quite insecure, despite the length:

    xx±±±±±±±±±±±±±±±±±±±±±±±±±±±±±±±±±±±±±±±±±±±±±±±±±±±±±±±±±±±±±±±±

    https://www.grc.com/haystack.htm
     
  17. bambua

    bambua Well-Known Member

    Nice link Floris, describes that process very well.
     
  18. Floris

    Floris Guest

    Steve Gibson for the win!
     
  19. DRE

    DRE Well-Known Member

    That whole paragraph was your gmail password?
     
  20. Adam Howard

    Adam Howard Well-Known Member

    Not Gmail. Some place else less important, but with 2 step verification as well.
     
    simbolo likes this.

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