• This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn more.

Curiosity - Mars Science Laboratory

Shelley

Well-known member
#1
Nasa's next Robotic Rover.

I've been following this for a good number of years now, also watched the launch (november (2011) and been closely following ever since awith it due to arrive at mars and perform it's landing on August 5th. Anyone else been following this mission? I'm quite excited about it and hope everything goes to plan with the never done before landing.

To find out, the rover will carry the biggest, most advanced suite of instruments for scientific studies ever sent to the martian surface. The rover will analyze samples scooped from the soil and drilled from rocks. The record of the planet's climate and geology is essentially "written in the rocks and soil" -- in their formation, structure, and chemical composition. The rover's onboard laboratory will study rocks, soils, and the local geologic setting in order to detect chemical building blocks of life (e.g., forms of carbon) on Mars and will assess what the martian environment was like in the past.
Link: http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/
 

Adam Howard

Well-known member
#2
YES

Given that this new robot is about the size of a small car (smart car)... It will be interesting if it can make the landing. Very daring more on how they plan on landing it too.

Yet it will have less chances of getting stuck and also will move a little faster.
 

Shelley

Well-known member
#3
YES

Given that this new robot is about the size of a small car (smart car)... It will be interesting if it can make the landing. Very daring more on how they plan on landing it too.

Yet it will have less chances of getting stuck and also will move a little faster.
Yeah the landing is very adventurous but I would expect anything less from the folks that work at NASA. I noticed the parachute specialist who worked on the previous rover missions has been recruited for this mission so they're falling back in reliable past contractors which is a good thing. I actually think the Rover will go at the same speed as the previous two rovers but your right less chance of getting stuck. More importantly, They're not relying on solar cell technology this time so they won't have to put the Rover in hibernation in the Martian winter.

I'm sad so i'll be staying up to watch all of this come august 5th, August the 6th my time. :p
 

Adam Howard

Well-known member
#4
Yeah the landing is very adventurous but I would expect anything less from the folks that work at NASA. I noticed the parachute specialist who worked on the previous rover missions has been recruited for this mission so they're falling back in reliable past contractors which is a good thing. I actually think the Rover will go at the same speed as the previous two rovers but your right less chance of getting stuck. More importantly, They're not relying on solar cell technology this time so they won't have to put the Rover in hibernation in the Martian winter.

I'm sad so i'll be staying up to watch all of this come august 5th, August the 6th my time. :p
???
 

Fred Sherman

Well-known member
#14
This is the most technically complex landing ever attempted in the history of mankind, beyond any of the lunar landings. The moment NASA is informed the landing has begun, the rover will have either been safely down or destroyed for 7 minutes. I'm crossing my fingers. This is going to be marvel of human ingenuity.
 

kyrgyz

Well-known member
#15
There is no live coverage right now. Gush, I hope everything is ok.


In the meantime here is the video explaining in detail the scientific instruments on board of Curiosity: