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Boycott Amazon.com?

Hoffi

Well-known member
#2
If you want to boycott every company with unhealthy halls or something else, you must bake your own bread and hunt your meat.
 

kyrgyz

Well-known member
#3
That's not just another company. The behemoth of online commerce has a market value of $110 billion but it can't take care of the basic work environment requirements.
In a lengthy and heavily reported article, The Call said a warehouse employee contacted the Occupational Safety and Health Administration on June 2 to report that the heat index in the warehouse had reached 102 degrees, and that 15 workers had collapsed. The employee also said workers who were sent home because of the heat received disciplinary points.

Eight days later, the paper said, an emergency room doctor at a local hospital saw enough Amazon employees suffering from heat-related injuries to call OSHA and report "an unsafe environment."

So many ambulances responded to medical assistance calls at the warehouse during a heat wave in May, the paper said, that the retailer paid Cetronia Ambulance Corps to have paramedics and ambulances stationed outside the warehouse during several days of excess heat over the summer. About 15 people were taken to hospitals, while 20 or 30 more were treated right there, the ambulance chief told The Call.

OSHA, which investigated conditions at the warehouse, told Amazon that the way the warehouse was run had "the potential to adversely impact" employee safety and health.
 

kyrgyz

Well-known member
#5
Workers in an Amazon.com warehouse were routinely sent to the emergency room because of sweltering, suffocating heat that sometimes exceeded 110 degrees — and because Amazon refused to open warehouse doors, fearing theft, according to a devastating exposé in the Allentown, Pennsylvania Morning Call. After workers, an E.R. doctor and a security guard complained, federal regulators investigated the warehouse and recommended changes. Amazon responded with popsicles, bandanas and finger pointing.
 

dieketzer

Well-known member
#12
Seriously? Is that your scientific answer? A lot of people have died from heat-related incidents.
more people havent died from heat-related incidents.
in all honesty, 38c isnt life-threatening hot. there are millions of people that spend long days working in that kind of heat.
 

jmurrayhead

Well-known member
#13
more people havent died from heat-related incidents.
in all honesty, 38c isnt life-threatening hot. there are millions of people that spend long days working in that kind of heat.
When I was a kid, I nearly blacked out just from playing basketball outside. It was only in the high-90s, approximately 36-37 C. Yes, other factors combined with heat lead to death, like dehydration. The point is, it is possible and preventable. Their merchandise is NOT worth even 1 employees life.
 

Edrondol

Well-known member
#14
more people havent died from heat-related incidents.
in all honesty, 38c isnt life-threatening hot. there are millions of people that spend long days working in that kind of heat.
Temperature has a little to do with heat related illness/death, but the real factor is hydration. You can work in really hot weather all day long if you have the hydration and the ability to take breaks. I have a feeling that Amazon refuses to allow people to take frequent breaks and hydration sneaks up on you if you're not used to it.

But when it's obvious that the business is not following well known and enforced safety standards your taunts of "boo hoo" are callous and reprehensible.
 

Forsaken

Well-known member
#15
if that were the case the world population would be half what it is today.
more people havent died from heat-related incidents.
in all honesty, 38c isnt life-threatening hot. there are millions of people that spend long days working in that kind of heat.
They are generally not in a confined warehouse that probably lacks a lot in the way of airflow (The industrial fans don't do crap).

Also, depending on the humidity, it can get stifling in such a situation, which would further lead to issues. They're also lifting and moving things which is physical exertion, which again adds to it.

All in all you're comparing completely different situations and making an ass out of yourself.
 

kyrgyz

Well-known member
#18
How much do you want to bet that Wal-Mart's public relations team had that article placed?
This kind of speculations has nothing to do with the fact that Amazon is in the wrong. If Wal-mart is indeed behind the revelation, I have no problem with that. Let them put out each other's dirty laundry.