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Wow brings back memories..

Nudaii

Well-known member
#1
Back in 2006-2007 i was a staff trainer for christianforums.com (60+ million posts, at that time 5000 members on at same time etc)

yet i retired from staff there in 2007

today i trained my first mod to use mod tools, and wow it brings back memories XD

For those who run websites that require mods, do you train your staff personally or give them a basic guide/manual?
 

Nudaii

Well-known member
#4
@Mike Edge

Thanks, I have been approached by many more big names in my niche who will offer me free facebook/twitter advertising

So i decided to train up my staff, most are either long retired (like I was XD) or never been moderators before.

once the announcements begin on the facebook/twitter things could get very busy, very very fast XD
 

karll

Well-known member
#6
I have several moderators, even though it's not a huge board. It can get heated at times, so it's good to have someone other than myself who can step in.

I have written up some vague and general advice for them. Other than that, I guess they get "training" by following the discussions in the mod forum and reports.

The most important thing though is to pick your moderators carefully.
 
#7
I advise new moderators to be leaders, but understand that they are inserting themselves into a problem-solving role. Other than that, I show them some basic functions and encourage them to enjoy themselves.
 

mistypants

Well-known member
#8
I have this video stickied in our staff section:


I find it's a good introduction to Xenforo's moderation tools (which are rather intuitive in themselves). I have a detailed guide on how to handle altercations between members & that sort of thing. We also log all of the disciplinary measures we take within our staff section, so new moderators can read through and observe how others are handling things and learn from it.

We also have an ongoing Skype chat where we can help each other out.

Selection is really important, though. You need someone mature, patient, dedicated, and ready to learn. I'm all for hiring people that may be a little rusty and teaching them to do things right, but there's got to be raw potential in there. We have an application & interview process that all of our staff undergoes before getting a seat on the team.
 

RoldanLT

Well-known member
#9
I have this video stickied in our staff section:


I find it's a good introduction to Xenforo's moderation tools (which are rather intuitive in themselves). I have a detailed guide on how to handle altercations between members & that sort of thing. We also log all of the disciplinary measures we take within our staff section, so new moderators can read through and observe how others are handling things and learn from it.

We also have an ongoing Skype chat where we can help each other out.

Selection is really important, though. You need someone mature, patient, dedicated, and ready to learn. I'm all for hiring people that may be a little rusty and teaching them to do things right, but there's got to be raw potential in there. We have an application & interview process that all of our staff undergoes before getting a seat on the team.
This video is outdated :(
 

tafreehm

Well-known member
#10
Back in 2006-2007 i was a staff trainer for christianforums.com (60+ million posts, at that time 5000 members on at same time etc)

yet i retired from staff there in 2007

today i trained my first mod to use mod tools, and wow it brings back memories XD

For those who run websites that require mods, do you train your staff personally or give them a basic guide/manual?
I have created tutorials for them, plus I copied videos and tuts from HAVE YOU SEEN forum.
I have a private 'staff only' forum, where I have few sticky threads containing all the information that new staff members needs to know. i.e how to do this, how to do that, etc. I sent then welcome PM on their first day and ask them to read those threads. That pretty much takes care of it, and then they ask question if anything is not clear.

Its not really that hard.