Keep your cars inside your house.

Gazhyde

Well-known member
#21
I wouldn't be worried in the slightest about this. Not having a key to enter a car illegally has not been an issue since the first person discovered the house brick method. This thief is at least being nice and not damaging the car, and for that they get a thumbs up from me. If you have stuff stolen from inside your car, then you are stupid to be leaving it in there in the first place.

What I would be more worried about is the well known security issue of being able to start your car through the on board diagnostic ports that almost every modern car has. A laptop, a cable and some software is all you need to get some modern cars going. There are no security protocols at all on car diagnostic ports.

Here in the UK the other preferred technique to avoid all security systems on your car is for 6 masked men with baseball bats to break in to your house and beat you until you hand over the keys. So keeping your car in you garage isn't actually that helpful.

I'm not sure why people expect cars to be secure, because like any website they are only as secure as the weakest link. On a website it's your password, on a car it's the key. With enough time and effort these can be bypassed.
 

Carlos

Well-known member
#22
Why not just go all out and not use a car. :rolleyes: Cars have been getting stolen since they were first invented - that's not going to change any time soon.

There's a something on the TV over here the other day from the police showing how easy it is to get past the new no-key mechanisms.
Did you even read thread? The notion that this is the first time cars are stolen isn't the problem, the problem is this:
My mom's car was an old generation car, so in other words, it requires a physical key just to get in, and likewise, to lock it, you'd need to manually lock it from inside. Now, to ignite a car, you'd need to either: Break the "hood" around the ignition to match the electric current with the right current to steal it. Or you could use like screwdriver to turn it on. The thief on Mother's Day (when it occurred) used NEITHER!
In theory: You put the mechanism next to the keylock, wait a few minutes, then the door's unlocked for you. Do the same to the ignition, the car starts up for you.
What I would be more worried about is the well known security issue of being able to start your car through the on board diagnostic ports that almost every modern car has. A laptop, a cable and some software is all you need to get some modern cars going. There are no security protocols at all on car diagnostic ports.
I was watching a show with all of these technology advancements, and I thought this was some kind of sci-fi crap. Wow.
 

Lisa

Well-known member
#23
Did you even read thread? The notion that this is the first time cars are stolen isn't the problem, the problem is this:

In theory: You put the mechanism next to the keylock, wait a few minutes, then the door's unlocked for you. Do the same to the ignition, the car starts up for you.
Yes I read the thread, but you're acting like it's never happened before. As I also said in my post there was a thing on about the no-key mechanisms and how easy they are to break into. It's not a surprise - why are you surprised by this.. it uses a computer, and computers get hacked all the time.
 

Carlos

Well-known member
#24
Yes I read the thread, but you're acting like it's never happened before. As I also said in my post there was a thing on about the no-key mechanisms and how easy they are to break into. It's not a surprise - why are you surprised by this.. it uses a computer, and computers get hacked all the time.
I'm surprised because these are older-generation cars, not these electric cars that you see in the top 10, 5, 3 most impossible cars to be stolen, that kind of thing. These older generation cars are gas-powered...

I thought electric cars were a bad idea, because to me, it seemed like a target for hackers. But the older cars? Not so much. Using older technology, older this and that. Just.. I donno.
 

Gazhyde

Well-known member
#25
I'm surprised because these are older-generation cars, not these electric cars that you see in the top 10, 5, 3 most impossible cars to be stolen, that kind of thing. These older generation cars are gas-powered...
Cars have had electronics in them for many years now, it's not relevant if they run on gas, electricity, moonshine or jelly beans.

No car is 100% secure from being stolen for the reasons I mentioned before. Look at this picture of a new BMW X6, you'd expect that to be pretty secure and extremely difficult steal right?

So how then does it end up in its component parts in the back of a van on the Hungarian/Romanian border? Simple, it was stolen in Italy! The article doesn't say how they stole it, but it was taken...
upload_2014-5-13_9-56-13.png
 

Tracy Perry

Well-known member
#26
I'm surprised because these are older-generation cars, not these electric cars that you see in the top 10, 5, 3 most impossible cars to be stolen, that kind of thing. These older generation cars are gas-powered...

I thought electric cars were a bad idea, because to me, it seemed like a target for hackers. But the older cars? Not so much. Using older technology, older this and that. Just.. I donno.
If it's not an early 80's or older - it's not an older generation car. Once computers started being used for more than the simple FI in them they became more prone to electronic measures. :p

Not to mention... a lot of the older cars are popular to be stolen to get chopped. Parts for them are not as widely available.

EDIT:

From Boston.com

For the first time, the Hot Wheels report from the National Insurance Crime Bureau looked at the 10 most stolen vehicles in 2012 by make and model, encompassing all model years. Preeviously, only one make, model, and year would appear in the top 10 stolen vehicles, even if other model years of the same car had earned a position on the list. As a result, the top 10 for this year shows that older cars and newer pickups are at the greatest risk for theft.
They also show that the most frequently stolen model years (this was for 2013 stats) were 1990-2000.

https://www.nicb.org/theft_and_fraud_awareness/top-vehicles-stolen-by-state

and Modesto, CA was the #1 hotspot (in the U.S) for car thefts during the 2012 reported time period.
 
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Carlos

Well-known member
#29
So how then does it end up in its component parts in the back of a van on the Hungarian/Romanian border? Simple, it was stolen in Italy! The article doesn't say how they stole it, but it was taken...
View attachment 73595
I saw something about these chopped up parts stuff... But the whole thing about going up to a car, and unlocking it from outside...? That's news to me and my family.
 
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