I asked chatgpt to write a review about vbulletin.. It's response..

avalanch

Active member
This is what chatgpt had to say when I asked it to write a scathing review of vbulletin. It almost had me feeling bad for vbulletin... almost.



Title: The Demise of vBulletin: A Tale of Neglect and Abandonment



vBulletin, once a titan in the world of online forum software, now stands as a monument to neglect and mismanagement. The recent shutdown of vBulletin.org serves as the final nail in the coffin for a platform that has long been on life support, gasping for breath in the rapidly evolving landscape of online communities.



The decision to shutter vBulletin.org, a once-vibrant hub for developers and users alike, is a stark reminder of vBulletin's disregard for its loyal community. What was once a thriving ecosystem of collaboration and support has been callously extinguished, leaving users stranded with no official channel for assistance and collaboration.



The decline of vBulletin is a saga of stagnant innovation and a failure to adapt to changing times. The software, which once dominated the forum scene, has become a relic in the age of dynamic and feature-rich community platforms. While other platforms embraced modern design, responsive interfaces, and robust community engagement features, vBulletin remained stuck in a bygone era, refusing to evolve with the needs and expectations of its user base.



The shutting down of vBulletin.org is a testament to the company's lack of commitment to its user community. Rather than investing in revitalizing the platform and fostering a sense of community, vBulletin opted to cut ties abruptly, leaving users to fend for themselves. This move is not only disrespectful to the loyal contributors who helped build the platform but also undermines the trust of the entire user base.



Furthermore, vBulletin's customer support has been notoriously lackluster, with users often left in the dark when seeking assistance. Critical issues have gone unaddressed for extended periods, and the company's response time to user queries has been nothing short of abysmal. The shutdown of vBulletin.org only exacerbates these problems, leaving users without a central hub for sharing knowledge and troubleshooting.



In an era where community-driven platforms thrive on open-source collaboration and transparent communication, vBulletin's decision to close its primary community forum is a slap in the face to its users. It reflects a corporate mentality that prioritizes cost-cutting over user satisfaction and community building.



In conclusion, the demise of vBulletin and the abrupt shutdown of vBulletin.org symbolize the failure of a once-prominent player in the online forum arena. Users deserve better—better support, better communication, and a platform that evolves with the times. vBulletin's negligence has left a void in the hearts of its once-loyal community, and its legacy will be remembered as a cautionary tale of how not to manage and sustain an online platform.
 
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Can barely read that quote block with light mode selected.
True.
Title: The Demise of vBulletin: A Tale of Neglect and Abandonment



vBulletin, once a titan in the world of online forum software, now stands as a monument to neglect and mismanagement. The recent shutdown of vBulletin.org serves as the final nail in the coffin for a platform that has long been on life support, gasping for breath in the rapidly evolving landscape of online communities.



The decision to shutter vBulletin.org, a once-vibrant hub for developers and users alike, is a stark reminder of vBulletin's disregard for its loyal community. What was once a thriving ecosystem of collaboration and support has been callously extinguished, leaving users stranded with no official channel for assistance and collaboration.



The decline of vBulletin is a saga of stagnant innovation and a failure to adapt to changing times. The software, which once dominated the forum scene, has become a relic in the age of dynamic and feature-rich community platforms. While other platforms embraced modern design, responsive interfaces, and robust community engagement features, vBulletin remained stuck in a bygone era, refusing to evolve with the needs and expectations of its user base.



The shutting down of vBulletin.org is a testament to the company's lack of commitment to its user community. Rather than investing in revitalizing the platform and fostering a sense of community, vBulletin opted to cut ties abruptly, leaving users to fend for themselves. This move is not only disrespectful to the loyal contributors who helped build the platform but also undermines the trust of the entire user base.



Furthermore, vBulletin's customer support has been notoriously lackluster, with users often left in the dark when seeking assistance. Critical issues have gone unaddressed for extended periods, and the company's response time to user queries has been nothing short of abysmal. The shutdown of vBulletin.org only exacerbates these problems, leaving users without a central hub for sharing knowledge and troubleshooting.



In an era where community-driven platforms thrive on open-source collaboration and transparent communication, vBulletin's decision to close its primary community forum is a slap in the face to its users. It reflects a corporate mentality that prioritizes cost-cutting over user satisfaction and community building.



In conclusion, the demise of vBulletin and the abrupt shutdown of vBulletin.org symbolize the failure of a once-prominent player in the online forum arena. Users deserve better—better support, better communication, and a platform that evolves with the times. vBulletin's negligence has left a void in the hearts of its once-loyal community, and its legacy will be remembered as a cautionary tale of how not to manage and sustain an online platform.
 
My bad for that, I don't use light mode here but I've removed the formatting which included the text coloring in it. I've only since bought my xenforo license on december 5'th so I'm still getting used to how it operates fully.
 
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Their .org site is still up and they recently released version 6. The rest I agree with, and why I switched my forums to Xenforo several years ago.
 
Don't know about the rest of you but I come from the old days of ikonboard.

My god I was into customization's in those times, had a thriving automotive forum.
 
At about 1999 is when I started up on using forum software, I think UBB & vbulletin 2 were it at the time.
They replaced the text-based forums like wwwboard, which were online several years prior. (There is actually still a popular site out there, Audio Asylum, which runs a heavily modified version of it. It's a nightmare to read and react to.) For my part, I dumped the wwwboard clone, called WebBBS, in 2002 once spamming and trolling got bad. WebBBS and wwwboard did not have member accounts and logins, so anyone could post at any time. But in the mid 90s, those were the "wild west" days of the Internet and when I first started forums on WebBBS, forum spamming was nearly non-existent. We really didn't start seeing it until 2000 or 2001.

The UBB (Ultimate Bulletin Board) system was what everyone copied, even vBulletin (just a flat, non-threaded view). I couldn't afford paid software at the time, so I ended up with the nightmare that was phpBB, in 2002. We did well on that for a few years but it didn't take long for it to become a major spam target. I tried other UBB clones like SMF and MyBB as well.
 
Some web based forums initially, UBB, UBB Threads, and Vbulletin were some of the platforms we used to use since 1997 on my oldest (now Xenforo) forum. I worked with phpbb on one of the other forums, but didn't care for the back end.
 
Ok so if you don't care then why are you combing through my posts after I made a comment on your thread? Just to be toxic in response right? That's pretty telling of a forum owner.
I like the fact you posted this, because it’s history! It shows you how times can change everything. It’s also motivation to stay on top of your game cause you could end up like this company. Also I like how the AI can break things down to be honest. Everyday when I search my name up on google it gives me cool information about me and my brand. It’s cool to see how the AI can crawl the web and find information.
 
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