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CSM, PRINCE2, DSDM Atern

SneakyDave

Well-known member
#4
In the old days of business cards, all of the people I worked with that had certifications listed on their business card were the ones that knew all the buzzwords, but had no real-world experience with their certifications, but maybe that was just a local phase for a while.

They might help a person get into a specific project or job, but I tend to stay away from those projects that require that type of expertise because it seems that the clients/employers don't really know how their methodologies work if they think certifications can deliver a better product.
 

Shamil

Well-known member
#5
In the old days of business cards, all of the people I worked with that had certifications listed on their business card were the ones that knew all the buzzwords, but had no real-world experience with their certifications, but maybe that was just a local phase for a while.

They might help a person get into a specific project or job, but I tend to stay away from those projects that require that type of expertise because it seems that the clients/employers don't really know how their methodologies work if they think certifications can deliver a better product.
One of the reasons I wanted to learn about Scrum, and in general, agile, is because one of the most frustrating things happened... we built a component of software, it took me about 3 weeks to do this. Today, it was scrapped. What I noticed were deficiencies and a little lack of collaboration - not to mention, I didn't even see the feature because it was 1 line in a Technical Specification document. Apart from that, we have daily scrum meetings (it's just a report meeting), but that's all - there is no real concept of anything agile as such, the team is just too flexible.