• This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn more.

Percona vs MariaDB vs MySQL in 2014

Alfa1

Well-known member
#1
What is the most optimal database server software currently?
I have read benchmarks by @eva2000 from some years ago and very informative posts by @Slavik @digitalpoint @p4guru @Deebs and others. I also found this interesting:
Percona 5.6 is much faster than MySQL 5.5/6 and MariaDB 5.5, but not faster than MariaDB 10. For example, Percona 5.6 uses a thread pool feature similar to the one available into enterprise version of MySQL.
Personally, id say any big board if possible should switch to percona. Adding litespeed or nginx in over apache will also supercharge the site, its quite the speedy setup :)

Are there any recent benchmarks which include MariaDB 10?
What are the benefits of one over the other?
 
Last edited:

Deebs

Well-known member
#3
What is the most optimal database server software currently?
I have read benchmarks by @eva2000 from some years ago and very informative posts by @Slavik @digitalpoint @p4guru @Deebs and others. I also found this interesting:




Are there any recent benchmarks which include MariaDB 10?
What are the benefits of one over the other?
For me it boils down to which Company is giving me the biggest bang for my buck. Percona excels in XtraDB (enhanced Innodb), MariaDB has the query optimizations, Oracle has neither as they do not accept patches (last time I checked and spoke to their account teams) but they have the in-memory cluster.

Both Percona and MariaDB port their patches, Percona has the ThreadPool from MariaDB, MariaDB offers XtraDB. It is very similar to Linux distros, each has their own following. For me, Percona is where I believe I need to be.

@Floren's comment makes no sense. Both MariaDB and Percona (ported from MariaDB) use the same ThreadPool patch which is different to Oracle's implementation. Percona cannot be slower due to the ThreadPool. Under certain workloads any of the three could excel or suffer. YMMV.
 

Slavik

XenForo moderator
Staff member
#4
Deebs pretty much echos my thoughts. I like to, if possible, keep everything closely tied together from a single vendor. Since I use their backup, analysis and recovery tools, I would probably stick with Percona for this reason.
 

Deebs

Well-known member
#5
Deebs pretty much echos my thoughts. I like to, if possible, keep everything closely tied together from a single vendor. Since I use their backup, analysis and recovery tools, I would probably stick with Percona for this reason.
Forgot to mention the awesome XtraBackup :)
 

Floren

Well-known member
#6
@Floren's comment makes no sense.
@eva2000 will perform soon a set of benchmarks on AXIVO MariaDB 10, compared to other available distributions.
I believe he awaits the 10.0.13 release, looking forward to the results. :)
Forgot to mention the awesome XtraBackup :)
It is a great product indeed. I have it compiled specifically for MariaDB 10, on AXIVO repo.
I wrote a tutorial how to easy upgrade to MariaDB 10 in RHEL6 based distributions.
 

digitalpoint

Well-known member
#7
No clue on MariaDB vs Percona, I suspect both will be good. We use Oracle's in-memory cluster system (ndbcluster is the storage engine, so we don't use InnoDB for anything).

We have an 8 node cluster interconnected with InfiniBand which ends up working out to a setup that can do about 15M read queries per second while doing about 5M writes per second at the same time.
 

CTXMedia

Formerly CyclingTribe
#8
We have an 8 node cluster interconnected with InfiniBand which ends up working out to a setup that can do about 15M read queries per second while doing about 5M writes per second at the same time.
Whoooaaa!!! <faints> :notworthy: - do you actually need that level of capability Shawn or have you built in a lot of overhead for future growth? (Apologies for the minor thread hijack but that's some capability!!)
 

Slavik

XenForo moderator
Staff member
#9
Whoooaaa!!! <faints> :notworthy: - do you actually need that level of capability Shawn or have you built in a lot of overhead for future growth? (Apologies for the minor thread hijack but that's some capability!!)
I'm guessing a lot of it is just to ensure any fail over wont crumble the other servers.

If I recall DP has half the servers in 1 rack and half in another, so even if an entire rack goes down his site can still stay running.
 

Slavik

XenForo moderator
Staff member
#10
@eva2000 will perform soon a set of benchmarks on AXIVO MariaDB 10, compared to other available distributions.
I believe he awaits the 10.0.13 release, looking forward to the results. :)

It is a great product indeed. I have it compiled specifically for MariaDB 10, on AXIVO repo.
I wrote a tutorial how to easy upgrade to MariaDB 10 in RHEL6 based distributions.
Looking forward to the results.
 

digitalpoint

Well-known member
#11
Whoooaaa!!! <faints> :notworthy: - do you actually need that level of capability Shawn or have you built in a lot of overhead for future growth? (Apologies for the minor thread hijack but that's some capability!!)
Mostly I don't like upgrading hardware, so I like to way overkill stuff from the beginning. But there is way more going on with the site than the forum.

This is a huge resource hog with just under 100,000 users using it daily (and logging results of millions of keywords every day):
https://tools.digitalpoint.com/tracker

This spiders the web 24/7... also a resource hog with everything it's logging into the database:
https://tools.digitalpoint.com/cookie-search

This stuff serves stuff (and logs to database in some cases) every page view of every site using them:
https://tools.digitalpoint.com/geovisitors
https://tools.digitalpoint.com/social-buttons
https://advertising.digitalpoint.com/

Resource-wise, the forum is basically nothing compared to the rest of the stuff going on.

I'm guessing a lot of it is just to ensure any fail over wont crumble the other servers.

If I recall DP has half the servers in 1 rack and half in another, so even if an entire rack goes down his site can still stay running.
Sort of... they are in the same physical rack, but all equipment in that rack is on two totally different/isolated electrical circuits (an N+1 electrical setup in the data center)... basically meaning if a lightning strike happened or something else crazy that actually destroyed the electrical system in the data center, there's a completely separate/redundant electrical system.

Each piece of equipment (switches, servers, etc.) has 2 power supplies for redundancy (any one can go without taking anything down), with each power supply plugged into different electrical circuits.

Each server is running a RAID-6 setup (they each have 6 hot swappable hard drives and any two can fail before the RAID volume fails). Even if a server totally fails the database cluster doesn't go down because it doesn't need all nodes to function (all data is stored on 2 different nodes for redundancy).

Is that long winded enough? :)
 

MattW

Well-known member
#12
Sort of... they are in the same physical rack, but all equipment in that rack is on two totally different/isolated electrical circuits (an N+1 electrical setup in the data center)... basically meaning if a lightning strike happened or something else crazy that actually destroyed the electrical system in the data center, there's a completely separate/redundant electrical system.

Each piece of equipment (switches, servers, etc.) has 2 power supplies for redundancy (any one can go without taking anything down), with each power supply plugged into different electrical circuits.
Unless someone starts physically messing with the power ;)
 

eva2000

Well-known member
#16
Why are you wasting time here talking, get back to benching :eek:

:D
well preparing Centmin Mod for other goodies before MariaDB 10.0.13 arrival :)

Code:
php -v
PHP 5.6.0RC1 (cli) (built: Jun 23 2014 06:35:50)
Copyright (c) 1997-2014 The PHP Group
Zend Engine v2.6.0-dev, Copyright (c) 1998-2014 Zend Technologies
    with Zend OPcache v7.0.4-dev, Copyright (c) 1999-2014, by Zend Technologies
 

DJ XtAzY

Active member
#17
I can't wait for the benchmarks but as long as it's not biased. Not choosing sides since I think they both have strength and weaknesses. Just curious, what would your stance IF Persona was faster..... again, just a "what if".
 

eva2000

Well-known member
#18
I can't wait for the benchmarks but as long as it's not biased. Not choosing sides since I think they both have strength and weaknesses. Just curious, what would your stance IF Persona was faster..... again, just a "what if".
Personally, I'd stick with MariaDB for Centmin Mod as it's only one that has improvements in InnoDB via Percona XtraDB InnoDB engine inclusion + improvements in MySQL core for MyISAM too. Percona only focuses on InnoDB improvements. So it's up to end user to choose which they want to use based on their own specific MySQL engine usage requirements. For me 50/50 MyISAM and InnoDB usage depending on web app used so it's beneficial to go with MariaDB for flexibility :)

That being said Centmin Mod already has Percona YUM repository support since .04 http://centminmod.com/changelog.html#123eva200004 if there's ever the need for MariaDB to Percona switching :)

My old benchmarks where results are only valid for the specific versions tested back then at http://vbtechsupport.com/657/ and http://vbtechsupport.com/606/ for MariaDB 5.2. MariaDB 5.5/10 will still retain the core/MyISAM improvements which Percona doesn't have even in Percona 5.5/5.6.
 
Last edited:

Floren

Well-known member
#19
Personally, I'd stick with MariaDB for Centmin Mod as it's only one that has improvements in InnoDB via Percona XtraDB InnoDB engine inclusion + improvements in MySQL core for MyISAM too.
So after all, what I said earlier did made sense. :giggle:
@eva2000, when you are ready to benchmark, please hit me on Skype.