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Location links to Google Maps - awesome!

TNCclubman

Well-known member
#2
dude, try entering a detailed address... so cool if your community uses it like a 'check in' feature to keep tabs of each other.
 

Erik

Well-known member
#6
Basically it use a variety of data sources (whatever is available on the device) to approximate your location as close as possible. For desktops/laptops this usually means connecting to Google Location Services and using the SSID of the wireless network you're on to find your location (if you're not on a wireless network, it will usually just use the IP address to get a location that's at least accurate to a city). For cell phones like the iPhone, the device will use the GPS (if it has one) to provide a location that's usually accurate to within 15 feet.

You can demo it here:
http://html5demos.com/geo

If you browse to this page on an iPhone and allow it access, it should show your exact GPS position. :)
 
F

Floris

Guest
#8
quite spooky, feels like magic technology :)

I've turned off in Safari that sites can just collect geolocation data. Or at least, it will ask for Allow when they try to.
 

Erik

Well-known member
#10
ok this is spooky, I went on this page with my home computer and it listed my exact address (said I live between 250 and 260 adeleaide st w in toronto and pinned my location on the map. My desktop doesnt have GPS.

http://maxheapsize.com/static/html5geolocationdemo.html

how the heck did it do that?
Are you browsing through a wireless router? When Google went around to collect all the street view images, they also sucked down wireless network SSID's and matched them up with the actual location as recorded by a GPS in the car. So they know if you are connected to X wireless network, there is a very good probability you are physically at Y location.

Third party companies like Skyhook Wireless collect this data as well. Your browser taps into this database through the 'net to find your true location (or at least make a very good guess). :)
 

Erik

Well-known member
#11
quite spooky, feels like magic technology :)

I've turned off in Safari that sites can just collect geolocation data. Or at least, it will ask for Allow when they try to.
Yeah, at least the nice thing is that at the very least any decent browser/device will explicitly ask your permission before providing this data. :)
 

TNCclubman

Well-known member
#12
When Google went around to collect all the street view images, they also sucked down wireless network SSID's and matched them up with the actual location as recorded by a GPS in the car. So they know if you are connected to X wireless network, there is a very good probability you are physically at Y location.
Those sneaky *******s! lol That has to be it.

So if I change my hotspot name im invisible again?
 
F

Floris

Guest
#15
No, I mean, if your ISP, that range, is known .. It can be used for your neighbor as well as you again.
 

Erik

Well-known member
#16
Those sneaky *******s! lol That has to be it.

So if I change my hotspot name im invisible again?
Or just deny all geolocation requests. Honestly, it probably uses some unique identifier other than the name (SSID) to identify the router (like the router MAC address or something). I'm not sure changing the name would do anything at this point. But it's worth a shot.

No, I mean, if your ISP, that range, is known .. It can be used for your neighbor as well as you again.
Not sure what you're trying to say here, can you explain?
 

TNCclubman

Well-known member
#17
I think its amazing really. Id definitely use this for a 'Friend Map' feature with big letters "Allow our map to pinpoint your current location' click yes to the popup. or something like that to let people know.
 
F

Floris

Guest
#18
Erik, go to dnsstuff.com enter in the right input box to look up IP, your own IP.
It will disclose who owns the IP range, where it is registered for.
This is already a step closer to finding what country someone is from, which state, and usually pretty close to a street.
ISP usually are sloppy and cover a bigger range.
But known data from other people can help you narrow it down.

Even if you do not disclose your geolocation details, even a timestamp can determine where in the world at least you are, helping companies narrow down which advertisements are more to your interest. Think .. summer in Australia not being the same months as in Europe.

http://dev.w3.org/geo/api/spec-source.html

http://www.mozilla.com/en-US/firefox/geolocation/
 

Erik

Well-known member
#19
Erik, go to dnsstuff.com enter in the right input box to look up IP, your own IP.
It will disclose who owns the IP range, where it is registered for.
This is already a step closer to finding what country someone is from, which state, and usually pretty close to a street.
ISP usually are sloppy and cover a bigger range.
But known data from other people can help you narrow it down.

Even if you do not disclose your geolocation details, even a timestamp can determine where in the world at least you are, helping companies narrow down which advertisements are more to your interest. Think .. summer in Australia not being the same months as in Europe.

http://dev.w3.org/geo/api/spec-source.html

http://www.mozilla.com/en-US/firefox/geolocation/
Oh yeah, just simple IP-based geolocation. I've known about this for a while. :) The funny thing is, I'm at a secondary residence right now, and at my house it works great - gets it correct down to the city (I've done it before). Here, though, it says I'm in California when I'm actually in Minnesota. Might need to update their location information database. :p
 
F

Floris

Guest
#20
Yeah, my IP says I am from Arnhem, while I am closer to Amsterdam, but actually in Purmerend.
I've got my cable modem set to a Mac address from China. Just to see what it will say in a year from now :p