CSS Grid: get rid of Bootstrap, JavaScript, CSS hacks

Freelancer

Well-known member
No, exactly now is the time. And the reasons are said in the video. Flexbox is nice, but also too complicated to achieve real appealing responsive layouts.
 

Brad Padgett

Well-known member
This is truly the next big thing. We still have to wait for older browsers to not be as common.

This beats out flexbox any day. However, I believe it was just released in March of 2017 for major browsers so it's going to be a while before I use it for any future clients.
 

Freelancer

Well-known member
If you are a pro web designer like me, now is the time to start getting into it. I kinda waited for it since years. Glad this is now coming.
 

rainmotorsports

Well-known member
If you are a pro web designer like me, now is the time to start getting into it. I kinda waited for it since years. Glad this is now coming.
Now is never the time. A professional never actually says screw this browser or screw that browser. A professional is well briefed in developing for their clients needs. If your clients or in the case of being a developer and not an owner, your clients clients. Work in business, in government, use the library. You have to develop for those browsers.

I have a personal support policy of 10 years or 3 major OS versions whatever comes first. This is of course mainly leaning towards the windows side in definition. So Win 7, 8 and 10 which means IE 11, Edge and at a minimum 2 Firefox ESR releases ago, etc. Last 2 iOS versions, etc.

The first version of Firefox to support CSS Grid? Was 52 thats the very latest ESR release. So if your site has any business customers you may be excluding them from properly accessing the site.

The good news is IE 10/11 actually has some support and the last couple of versions of Firefox and Chrome do so honestly for some sites its only a year or two away from being acceptable to use it purely. I am not including work arounds in that concept.
 

Forsaken

Well-known member
If you are a pro web designer like me, now is the time to start getting into it. I kinda waited for it since years. Glad this is now coming.
I've been playing with this since IE started supporting it, and even there there are still some bugs and issues.

It's going to be quite a while before you're able to use this for a production site that is more than a test bed or showcase.

I'm all for semantics, but semantics have to take a backseat to usability and accessibility always. If what you're doing is going to create any confusion or issues for your users than you're doing it wrong.
 

Arty

Well-known member
I think IE is not the biggest issue - old phones is. That is why it would make sense to use mobile first approach and wrapping media queries in
Code:
@supports
that checks for grid. Then old browsers will see mobile layout, modern browsers will see responsive page with grid. IE Edge should fix support soon, old IE should be fine with mobile layout.
 

rainmotorsports

Well-known member
@Arty I don't worry about phones too much but what are you seeing out there. I figured iOS devices we're on one of the last 2 releases or too old for most people. Chrome became the default browser on Android in 4.0 with the current version supporting 4.1. Low end devices in the US were rocking 4.4 about 2 years ago and my first device which was released 6 years ago ended up with 4.1 as the last official release.

Mind you that's a US perspective and doesn't cover developing countries. I guess on area that is a problem is Windows Phone lol. We also haven't found a way to kidnap dolphin users who are too smart for their own damn good.
 

Freelancer

Well-known member
Now is never the time. A professional never actually says screw this browser or screw that browser. A professional is well briefed in developing for their clients needs. If your clients or in the case of being a developer and not an owner, your clients clients. Work in business, in government, use the library. You have to develop for those browsers.
A professional does not deal in absolutes. Because absolutes do not exist. You do not use one method only and then switch to another in 10 years. You can easily combine flex-box or whatever fallback method with CSS Grid and have the browser pick what he can. You have to develop for the best user experience. Does a website need to look 100% the same on all browsers? Nope.
 

Kintaro

Well-known member
On mobile imagine to say goodbye to sidebars that disappear and say welcome to sidebar that split displaying only some content of them above the main content, some content of them below the main content and hide some other content (banners, profile boxes, latest posts)

And the reasons are said in the video.
Exactly.
 
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